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Father Posts Apparent Triple-Murder Confession on Facebook

A father in Canada appears to have admitted on his Facebook page to killing his daughter, then wife, then sister before taking his own life.

"Over the last 10 days I have done some of the worst things I could have ever imagined a person doing," read a post on Randy Janzen's Facebook page on Thursday afternoon.

In the apparent confession, the British Columbia man says that his 19-year-old daughter Emily had been plagued since elementary school by migraines, which had gotten so debilitating that she had missed two years of college.

"I just could not see my little girl hurt for one more second," the post, which was not verified by NBC News, read. "I took a gun and shot her in the head and now she is migraine free and floating in the clouds on a sunny afternoon, her long beautiful brown hair flowing in the breeze, a true angel."

The post goes on to say that he then shot his wife, Laurel, because a mother should never have to "hear the news her baby has died." A couple days after that, Janzen allegedly killed his sister, Shelly, "because I did not want her to have to live with this shame."

"Now my family is pain free and in heaven," The post said. It was signed "Rest in peace my little family, Love Daddio xoxo."

Authorities found one of the victims at a house in Langley, British Columbia, several hours after the Facebook post went up, local media reported. Soon after, they arrived at another house in the Rosedale Popkum area, where Janzen was reportedly barricaded inside.

Neighbors told The Huffington Post British Columbia that they heard gunshots and then a loud bang, and that the house went up in flames.

"It's believed that several members of one family, including the suspect, are deceased," Sgt. Stephanie Ashton from the Integrated Homicide Investigative Team of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said at a news conference Friday. Investigators did not return a call from NBC News on Saturday.

The Facebook post called Emily "the best little girl two parents could ever hope for," and said she "excelled at so many things but slowly had to stop almost everything because of the migraines," including her passion, singing.

Migraines are a neurological disorder characterized by a severe headache accompanied by sensitivity to light, sounds or smells. In the U.S., about 12 percent of the population, or 36 million Americans, suffer from migraine headaches, according to the American Migraine Foundation.

— Elizabeth Chuck