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World War I Planes Still Flying 95 Years Later

Of the 55,000 planes that were manufactured by Britain's Royal Army Corps during World War I, only 20 remain in airworthy condition.

. Of the 55,000 planes that were manufactured by the Royal Army Corps during World War I only 20 remain in airworthy condition. Six of these belong to The Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden in Bedfordshire, England — making it the most complete collection of original airworthy WWI aircraft in the world.

Above, Shuttleworth Collection pilot Rob Millinship, poses next to a Sopwith Pup before an air demonstration of the rare WWI aircraft on July 21 in Biggleswade, England. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

. Aviation enthusiast Patrick Wilson, 8, looks at an Avro 504 k at The Shuttlesworth Collection. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

. A detail shot of a SE5a is seen at The Shuttlesworth Collection. The SE5a is a single-seater-fighter aircraft and is an original biplane designed by the Royal Aircraft Factory. It was issued to the 84 Squadron in November 1918. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

. The SE5a is taken to position for a demonstration flight. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

. Shuttleworth Collection pilot Rodger 'Dodge' Bailey prepares for a demonstration flight in an SE5a. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

. The Shuttlesworth Collection’s SE5a is prepared for a demonstration flight. It’s one of the last remaining World War I biplanes from the Royal Army Corps fleet that once contained more than 55,000 planes. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

. Shuttleworth Collection pilot Rodger 'Dodge' Bailey takes off in the SE5a for a demonstration flight. The rare biplane saw action in France with the 84 Squadron the day before Armistice, on Nov. 10, 1918.

Gallery: Unpublished WWI Images Show Eerie Machinery of War Dan Kitwood / Getty Images