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Democrats Spar on Immigration, Trade in Florida Debate

Democratic Debate Recap: Clinton, Sanders Exchange Jabs in Miami 1:55

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders went toe-to-toe in another Democratic debate Wednesday night, just a day after the Vermont senator defeated Clinton in Michigan and less than a week before a number of important primary contests taking place next week.

Check out the recap of our debate live-blog below for all the news and analysis:

RECAP: FLORIDA DEMOCRATIC DEBATE

David Taintor

The Candidates' Closing Statements

The Candidates' Closing Statements

Hillary Clinton said she will work to break down barriers of all kinds -- economic, educational, health care. "I'm going to do everything I can to make sure we unite our country," Clinton said.

Bernie Sanders hit on the major theme of his campaign: economic inequality. "Is it acceptable that Wall Street and billionaires are spending hundreds of millions of dollars trying to buy elections? Is that democracy or is that oligarchy?" he said.

That's a wrap on the Democratic debate. Thanks for joining us tonight.

And if you're still looking for a good read, check out the latest #Decision2016 news here.

Clinton: Puerto Ricans Are Citizens

Clinton: Puerto Ricans Are a Priority

When asked whether she would address Puerto Rico's $70 billion debt crisis in her first 100 days in office, Hillary Clinton said she "absolutely" would.

"I hope it happens before I'm president, if I'm so fortunate enough to be," she said.

Clinton blamed the Republican Congress for failing to restructure Puerto Rico's amounting debt, calling it a "grave injustice" for ignoring the "citizens of America."

Bernie Sanders also chimed in and blamed "vulture capitalists" for helping Puerto Rico spiral into debt.

Leigh Ann Caldwell

Sanders Asked About Complimentary Remarks About Dictators

Sanders Asked About Complimentary Remarks About Dictators

Moderators aired tape of Sanders from 1985 complimenting authoritarian Latin American rules, including Fidel Castro of Cuba and Jose Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua.

Sanders avoiding addressing those comments. Instead he said he didn't support U.S. efforts to overthrow the two leaders.

It's the first time Sanders has been asked about those statements during a debate.

Democratic Candidates Share Their Hopes for Cuba 1:21
David Taintor

What to Do About Climate Change?

What to Do About Climate Change?

Climate change is a key issue in Florida, which faces the threat of rising sea levels. Both candidates emphasized the need to address global warming, with Bernie Sanders calling for a tax on carbon and Hillary Clinton calling for investment in "resilience and mitigation" while cutting emissions.

Of course, any major reforms to address climate change face tough, if not insurmountable, odds in the Republican-controlled Congress.

Leigh Ann Caldwell

Clinton Wants Sanders to Hammer Republicans, Too

Clinton Wants Sanders to Hammer Republicans, Too

"Sen. Sanders is always criticizing the two recent Democratic presidents," Clinton said.

"I wish he would join me in criticizing George W. Bush who wrecked the economy," she added. "Trickle down economics: one of the worst ideas since snake oil."

Leigh Ann Caldwell

Sanders: Trump's Kids Should Be Eligible for Free College

Sanders: Trump's Kids Should Be Eligible for Free College

Sanders was asked if Donald Trump's should be able to go to college for free.

Sanders said yes. Because his plan is for free college at public universities (not private), Sanders said he doesn't think they will.

"Donald Trump's kids can go to public school right now," he noted.

"All of our people, regardless of income, should have a right to get a higher education," he added.

Clinton doesn't support free college. She supports allowing students to refinance student debt and pay back a percentage of their income.

That's also a plan that Sanders supports too for people who currently hold student debt. He said Clinton copied a very good plan.

Leigh Ann Caldwell

The Crowd Does Not Want To Hear About Benghazi

The Crowd Does Not Want To Hear About Benghazi

When the moderators asked Clinton about Benghazi, the crowd booed.

It is the first time Clinton has been asked about the attacks that killed four Americans, including ambassador Chris Stevens.

Clinton said Republicans are politicizing the issue.

Sanders didn't comment on Benghazi, but said he isn't "so aggressive" on regime change. He brought up the war in Iraq and his opposition to it. He also once again condemned her "praise" of Henry Kissinger.

David Taintor

Clinton, Sanders Spar Over Big Money in Politics

Clinton, Sanders Spar Over Big Money in Politics

A question about Hillary Clinton's closed-door speeches before Wall Street firms quickly turned into a clash over campaign contributions, with Sanders hitting the Democratic front-runner over financial sector contributions to her super PAC.

Sanders said Clinton must have given great speeches to Goldman Sachs in order to receive six-figure sums. "When you get paid $250,000, that means that speech must have been an extraordinarily wonderful speech. "I would think that a speech so great, that you got paid so much money for, you would like to share it with the American people."

Sanders: I Am Dangerous...For Wall Street 0:41

Sanders often highlights the fact that he hasn't accepted campaign contributions from Wall Street. Clinton pointed out that the conservative industrialists the Koch brothers have put up an aid praising the Vermont senator.

Candidates Will Bring Deported Families Together

Candidates Pledge to Bring Deported Families Together Again

Continuing on the subject of deportation, both candidates pledged that they would not break apart families who came to the U.S. as undocumented immigrants.

A woman from the crowd told the candidates that her "hard working" husband was deported because he "didn't have a license," leaving her and their several children in the U.S.

Sanders, who thought the woman said her children were deported, said that the "heart" of his immigration plan was to bring back deported family members back to the United States.

"We're trying to unite families, not to divide families," he said before calling the division "immoral."

Clinton also said that she would do her best to bring families back together, and praised the woman for telling her story.

"Please know how brave I think you are coming here with your children to tell your story," she said. "I've heard stories like yours, they're not uncommon."

Leigh Ann Caldwell

I'm Not a Natural Politician

I'm Not a Natural Politician

Clinton was asked about polls where respondents say they doubt her honesty and trustworthiness.

In a very real moment, Clinton noted one of her weaknesses.

"I'm not a natural politician," she said, adding that she's not as good at campaigning as her husband or President Barack Obama.

She said she compensates for working hard and working to make changes in people's lives.

David Taintor

Hillary Clinton Mocks Trump's Border Wall Proposal

Hillary Clinton Mocks Trump's Border Wall Proposal

Hillary Clinton said there was a "big difference" between her support while in Congress for tougher border measures and Donald Trump's plans to build a massive border wall.

"He's talking about a very tall wall, right? Clinton said, echoing language Trump uses on the campaign trail. "A beautiful, tall wall," she continued, drawing some chuckles from the audience. "The most beautiful, tall wall … it's just fantasy."

'Basta!' Clinton Touts Calling Trump Out on 'Offensive' Rhetoric 1:03

Clinton said the work Congress did on securing the border has led to the lowest level of border apprehensions in decades, which should pave the way for immigration reform.

Bernie Sanders said he mostly agrees with Clinton on the issue. "Look, in this country, immigration reform is a very hot debate," Sanders said. "But I would hope … that as we have that debate we do not, as Donald Trump and others have done, resort to racism and xenophobia and bigotry"

Leigh Ann Caldwell

Clinton Goes After Sanders on Opposition to Auto Bailout

Clinton Goes After Sanders on Opposition to Auto Bailout

It didn't help in Michigan, but looking ahead to Ohio, another big car manufacturing state, Clinton hounded Sanders on his vote against the auto bailout.

Sanders' response is that he voted against he bill because it was also part of the massive Wall Street bailout.

"That was the bailout of the recklessness" of Wall Street, he said.

David Taintor

Clinton: I Will Not Deport Children

Clinton: I Will Not Deport Children

Hillary Clinton vowed not to deport children and undocumented immigrants without criminal records.

"Of the people living in our country, I do not want to see them deported, I want to see them on a path to citizenship," Clinton said.

Clinton: I Will Not Deport Children 2:04

Bernie Sanders also vowed that he would not deport those groups.

The two candidates sparred over the issue of asylum for migrant children fleeing violence in Central America.

Clinton and Sanders Pressed on Immigration Reform

Clinton and Sanders Pressed on Immigration Reform

Hillary Clinton was made to answer to a comment she made in 2003 where she told a New York City radio host that businesses should stop "employing illegal immigrants."

Clinton, who has been called out for "his pandering"--pandering to Hispanic voters--was asked whether she had flipped flopped on the issue in the past 10 years.

"In 2003, I sponsored the Dreamer Act," Clinton said before reminding the crowd that she was also in favor for immigration reform bill proposed in 2007. "I am staunchly in favor for immigration reform."

Sanders was then pressed about comments he made in 2007 in an attempt to justify his vote against the reform bill issued that year. The Vermont senator argued that the guest-work-for-hire bill would have eventually driven wages down for American workers.

"The guest worker program was akin to slavery," he said. "That kind of effort leads to a race to the bottom."

Sanders then said that he voted for the 2013 bipartisan Senate bill.

Leigh Ann Caldwell

Sanders Finds Difference With Clinton on Immigration

Sanders Finds Difference With Clinton on Immigration

While both Clinton and Sanders support a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, both are trying to find differences in their immigration plan.

Sanders knocked Clinton for saying in the summer of 2014 during the migrant border crisis that the migrants should be sent back.

Clinton defended her statements in 2014, saying she was concerned about their safety making the long, dangerous trek.

But at the time, Clinton didn't indicate that she was concerned about their safety but that wanted to send the migrants a message that it wasn't o.k. to come to the U.S. illegally.

In turn, Clinton criticized Sanders for voting against efforts to pass comprehensive immigration reform in 2007.

David Taintor

Candidates Pile on Donald Trump

Candidates Pile on Donald Trump

Both Clinton and Sanders hammered Donald Trump over his controversial comments.

The Washington Post's Karen Tumulty asked Clinton flat-out: Is Donald Trump a racist? Clinton didn't give a yes or no answer, but called the GOP front-runner's rhetoric "un-American." She added that voters can draw their own conclusions about Trump.

Sanders, meanwhile, said "the American people are never going to elect a president who insults Mexicans, who insults Muslims, who insults women, who insults African-Americans."

Clinton also used the debate, hosted by Univision, to say "basta" -- or enough -- to Trump, a phrase she has employed in at least one previous debate.

Leigh Ann Caldwell

Clinton Answers Questions About Emails - or Doesn't

Clinton Answers Questions About Emails - or Doesn't

Would Clinton Drop Out of 2016 Race If Indicted? 0:28

Clinton was asked about classification of emails on her private server as Secretary of State. She called it a case of "over classification" and "retroactive classification."

"I'm not concerned about it. I'm not worried about it," she said.

When she was asked if she would drop out if she was indicted, she immediately dismissed the question.

"I'm not even going to answer that question," she said.

Sanders: Email Controversy Will Take of Itself 0:35

David Taintor

Hillary Clinton After Michigan Loss: 'This is a Marathon'

Hillary Clinton After Michigan Loss: 'This is a Marathon'

Despite her narrow loss in Michigan Tuesday, Hillary Clinton said she was pleased with the way the night went for her. She scored an overwhelming victory in Mississippi, and came away with more delegates than Bernie Sanders at the end of the night.

"This is a marathon, and it's a marathon that can only be carried out by the kind of inclusive campaign that I'm running," Clinton said.

Pressed on "what went wrong in Michigan," Clinton said it was a "very close race."

Leigh Ann Caldwell

And We're Off

And We're Off

Sanders and Clinton's opening statements "of course" incorporate immigration reform.

Clinton: Comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship will be her priority in the first 100 days.

Sanders: "Of course" we need comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship.

David Taintor

Here We Go

Here We Go

The Democratic debate is getting underway. Stay right here for live coverage and reactions throughout the evening.