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First Read’s Morning Clips: Can Trump Remake the Electorate?

OFF TO THE RACES: Can Trump remake the electorate?

"Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton by 19 points — 55 percent to 36 percent — among voters who are currently serving or have previously served in the U.S. military," according to the latest NBC News|SurveyMonkey Weekly Election Tracking Poll. MORE: "Though Trump comfortably earns the support of military-affiliated voters overall, Clinton is perceived more favorably on the use of nuclear weapons. A sizable number of military and veteran voters say they would not be confident in Clinton or Trump's ability to be an effective commander-in-chief of the nation's military — but a slight majority would be confident in Trump (53 percent)."

NBC’s Dante Chinni asks: Can Trump remake the electorate?

Pro-Clinton group Priorities USA Action will air its new ad blasting Trump on national security issues during the Commander-in-Chief forum on NBC stations in Florida, Ohio, North Carolina, Colorado, Iowa and Nevada.

The DNC is out with a new video highlighting concerns about Donald Trump’s ability to manage nuclear weapons.

Critics say that Donald Trump’s list of military endorsers lacks some firepower.

The Dallas Morning News is endorsing Clinton — the paper’s first time picking a Democrat since before World War II.

Tim Kaine says that the idea of Trump as commander-in-chief “scares me to death,” NBC’s Kailani Koenig writes.

The AP notes that President Obama is "gently chiding Americans to resist turning a blind eye to the world outside their borders.”

Congressional Republicans are feeling more optimistic about Donald Trump, POLITICO writes. Also: outside groups have raised a LOT of money for Senate Republicans.

The New York Times reports on Trump’s "decades-long record of shattering political donation limits and circumventing the rules governing contributions and lobbying.”

The Washington Post’s Greg Sargent reminds us of the times Trump has bragged about giving politicians money to influence their behavior and actions.

Clinton’s latest tactic: accusing Trump of hiding “scams.”

Clinton has raised more from the oil and gas industry than Trump has, the Wall Street Journal notes.

Yesterday’s 50-state Washington Post-SurveyMonkey poll found that voters everywhere share "a pervasive pessimism that no matter the outcome, the election will do little to unify the country."

“[I]f the Koch brothers have lost the battle for conservative values in 2016, they are also quietly preparing for a long war,” writes the New York Times. "Their secret weapon is the Grassroots Leadership Academy: a training program dreamed up by the Americans for Prosperity Foundation, the political education arm of the Koch network, and intended to groom the next generation of conservative activists to shape the future of the Republican Party."

From POLITICO: "Voters in four competitive states will cast ballots in November on electronic machines that leave no paper trail — a lapse that threatens to sow distrust about a presidential election in which supporters of both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have raised fears about hackers tampering with the outcome."