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First Read’s Morning Clips: The Latest in the Comey Surprise

OFF TO THE RACES: The latest in the Comey Surprise

From NBC's Pete Williams and Tim Stelloh: "The FBI obtained a warrant to search emails related to the probe of Hillary Clinton's private server that were discovered on ex-congressman Anthony Weiner's laptop, law enforcement officials confirmed Sunday. The warrant came two days after FBI Director James Comey revealed the existence of the emails, which law enforcement sources said were linked to Weiner's estranged wife, top Clinton aide Huma Abedin. The sources said Abedin used the same laptop to send thousands of emails to Clinton."

From the Wall Street Journal over the weekend: "The new investigative effort, disclosed by FBI Director James Comey on Friday, shows a bureau at times in sharp internal disagreement over matters related to the Clintons, and how to handle those matters fairly and carefully in the middle of a national election campaign. Even as the probe of Mrs. Clinton's email use wound down in July, internal disagreements within the bureau and the Justice Department surrounding the Clintons' family philanthropy heated up, according to people familiar with the matter."

And from the Washington Post: "FBI agents argued — based at least in part on news accounts — earlier this year that the Clinton Foundation should be investigated for potentially giving donors special political access and favors. The Justice Department's public integrity unit said they did not have enough evidence to move forward. The Clinton Foundation said it was never contacted by the FBI, suggesting the bureau's efforts were in a preliminary stage as prosecutors weighed in. But agents in New York have sought to keep their inquiries alive, feuding with the Justice Department about the lengths to which they can go, according to people familiar with the matter."

Eric Holder is condemning FBI Director James Comey for his handling of the investigation into Clinton's private server.

And Clinton is going on the offensive, enlisting fellow Dems to go all in against Comey, NBC's Alex Seitz-Wald writes.

More on the wrangling, from the Washington Post: "Justice Department officials could have overruled FBI Director James B. Comey's surprising decision to notify Congress about the renewed investigation into Hillary Clinton's email server, but they stopped short of ordering him to back down. Their decision partly reflected the institutional power of the FBI director, Comey's personality and the political realities they were facing, according to current and former Justice officials. In this case, officials said Comey put the department in an untenable position by informing them that he was sending a letter to Congress because he had an obligation to lawmakers or they would feel misled."

The Republican National Committee says they were in good shape even before Friday's news. In a new memo from Sean Spicer and Jason Miller, the GOP lays out the reasons it believes Trump was already ascendant: "1) ObamaCare Is Still Proving To Be A Disaster … 2) Further Disclosures Of Clinton, Inc. … 3) Polls Are Moving Toward Trump … 4) Absentee And Early Voting… 5) A Movement Mentality." Their conclusion: "Between new exposure of the corrupt Clinton pay-to-play culture, our improved early vote numbers, and millions of voters who want change breaking late for Donald Trump, this race is anything but over. "

The effect on the race may be mitigated somewhat by Clinton's slim early vote lead, writes the New York Times.

From POLITICO: "The first national polls taken in the immediate aftermath of the election's latest October surprise suggest it's having a limited impact on the presidential polls so far. But there are a few swing states where the bombshell letter FBI Director James Comey sent to Congress Friday could still have a disproportionate effect."

Don't miss our latest polls in North Carolina and Florida.

From NBC's Benjy Sarlin: "Trump's emphasis on violence and retaliation, especially outside the confines of the law, is unique among modern nominees and is rooted in a set of guiding principles… To prevail in such an environment, he suggests, the response to any slight must be swift and overwhelming. Dwelling on limits imposed by law or tradition is usually a secondary concern."

The New York Times offers a portrait of a black community frightened by the notion of a Trump presidency.

David Farenthold sums up his findings about Trump's philanthropy - or lack thereof.

Miss Meet the Press? Catch up with ComPRESSed, with highlights including interviews with Mike Pence and Robby Mook.