Feedback
Politics

The Lid: The Perils of Gun Control Rhetoric for 2016 Hopefuls

Welcome to The Lid, your afternoon dose of the 2016 ethos…The British parliament will formally debate whether to bar Donald Trump from the UK after a petition calling for the GOP candidate's permanent expulsion garnered more than 568,000 signatures. Which in fairness is WAY more than the 34,435 signatures (this is true) on a White House petition to build a Death Star.

'16 from 30,000: President Obama pushed gun control into the 2016 race again on Tuesday, resulting in a predictable volley of partisan responses. Republicans like Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush and Ted Cruz vowed to immediately undo the president's executive actions, if elected. Hillary Clinton and her Democratic rivals applauded the president's emotional announcement. And while polling shows the country is generally divided on support for stricter gun laws, there are some potentially problematic areas for a candidate who wants to erase the president's plan. A Quinnipiac poll last month found voters overwhelmingly support background checks for buyers purchasing firearms at gun shows or online, with 89 percent in favor. Fifty-eight percent also support a nationwide ban on the sale of assault weapons, the poll found. That means all the tough talk we've heard from GOP candidates hoping to appeal to primary voters could come back to haunt the eventual nominee in the form of attack ads highlighting his (or her) opposition to largely popular reforms.

POPPING ON NBC POLITICS

When it comes to GOP voters' second choice candidates, Ted Cruz is in the top slot.

Palmetto State perks: South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley will deliver the GOP response to Obama's final State of the Union address.

In an emotional speech at the White House, President Barack Obama unveiled a series of executive actions on gun control.

Obama's announcement has put gun control at the center of the presidential candidate.

The UK parliament will debate a petition seeking to bar Donald Trump from entering the country.

Jeb Bush and his allies have now spent nearly $50 million on ads, NBC's Mark Murray reports.

Here's how Republicans and Democrats feel about their own political opponents.

Ted Cruz pulled a late night of campaigning in Iowa last night, Vaughn Hillyard writes.

FOR THE RECORD

"We're not gonna fix America with senators and congressmen."

  • Florida Sen. Marco Rubio

TOMORROW'S SKED

Ted Cruz continues his six-day bus tour across Iowa. Ben Carson also campaigns in the state.

Marco Rubio holds a campaign rally in Dallas.

Jeb Bush campaigns in New Hampshire.

Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley speak at a Nevada State Democratic Party dinner.