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Christmas Arrives for Orthodox Christians

Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas on Jan. 7, in accordance with the Julian calendar.

Ukrainians wearing traditional attire walk in front of a church as they mark the Orthodox Christmas in Pirogovo, near Kiev, on Jan. 7, 2016. According to the Central Intelligence Agency, Ukraine's population is overwhelmingly Christian. And up to two thirds identify themselves as Orthodox.

SERGEY DOLZHENKO / EPA

A girl holds a candle during a Mass to celebrate Orthodox Christmas at the Cathedral of St. Clement in Skopje, Macedonia.

ROBERT ATANASOVSKI / AFP - Getty Images

An actor dressed as Grandfather Frost, the Russian Santa Claus, walks next to a statue of Soviet Union founder Vladimir Lenin during celebration of Orthodox Christmas in St.Petersburg, Russia on Jan. 7.

Dmitry Lovetsky / AP

Soldiers line up to kiss a cross after an Orthodox Christmas service at their base in Minsk, Belarus.

Sergei Grits / AP

Fireworks explode behind a 150-foot Christmas tree as the air temperature hovered around -13 degrees Fahrenheit during Orthodox Christmas celebrations in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, Russia.

ILYA NAYMUSHIN / Reuters

People walk in front of the Holy Trinity Cathedral during midnight Christmas service in Tbilisi, Georgia, early on Jan. 7.

DAVID MDZINARISHVILI / Reuters
Ukrainian Orthodox believers attend the Christmas Eve Mass in the St. Volodymyr Cathedral in Kiev on Jan. 6. Sergei Chuzavkov / AP

Faithful burn dried oak branches, an Orthodox Christmas Eve tradition, in front of Saint Sava church in Belgrade, Serbia, on Jan. 6. The branches are also carried into the homes and burned on Christmas Day.

ANDREJ ISAKOVIC / AFP - Getty Images