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Deported Veterans Find a Home Across the Border

The Deported Veterans Support House in Tijuana, Mexico provides food, shelter, and clothing for deported veterans.

Deported U.S. Army veteran Hector Barajas looks out the front door of the Deported Veterans Support House, also known as "The Bunker," on July 3, 2017 in Tijuana, Mexico. Barajas, a legal U.S. resident who served more than five years in the military and was honorably discharged, founded and now runs the House. In addition to providing food, shelter, and clothing for deported veterans, he advocates for political legislation that would prohibit future deportations of veterans.

There are an estimated 11,000 non-citizens serving in the U.S. military, and most will be naturalized during or following their service. Those who leave the military early or who are convicted of a crime after serving can be deported. Veterans who serve the military as green card holders, not citizens, can be deported after committing certain crimes – including some minor offenses such as possession of marijuana and some more serious crimes such as murder and rape. 

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Deported U.S. Marine Corp veteran Alex Gomez rests on a cot at the House. 

RELATED: Rep. Joaquin Castro Leading Trip to Mexico to Meet With Deported Veterans 

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Barajas sorts through old family photos at the House.

Barajas, a legal U.S. resident, left the Army with an honorable discharge in 2001. After serving for five years, he struggled to adjust to life after the military. A few months after leaving the military, he was arrested and charged with discharging a firearm from a vehicle. No one was hurt, but the crime made him deportable. Barajas pleaded guilty and after two years in jail, he was deported to Mexico. 

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Deported U.S. Marine Corp veteran Mauricio Hernandez, who served in Afghanistan, kisses his daughter Emily as he visits the House.

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Barajas reveals his tattoo that says "U.S. Banished Veteran."

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Barajas stores his uniform inside a plastic bag.

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People stand by the U.S.-Mexico border fence at Playas de Tijuana during a Fourth of July gathering on the beach.

RELATED: Group Wants Veterans' Deportations Addressed in Presidential Debate 

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A woman helps fix Barajas' uniform.

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Gomez hangs a flag on the border fence. 

RELATED: Having Served in U.S. Military, Immigrants fight Deportation Orders 

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Barajas adjusts crosses that honor the deported veterans who have died.

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Deported U.S. Marine Corp veteran Richard Avila looks through the U.S.-Mexico border fence.

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A man shoots off fireworks next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence.

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