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Floods Overwhelm Chile’s Capital, Fouling Water Supply

Heavy rains and landslides in Santiago have contaminated the city's water supply, leaving millions without tap water.

The Mapocho River overflows its band during heavy rains in Santiago on April 17, 2016. The Mapocho flooded several districts of the city and landslides killed at least one person. Seven others are missing and officials said some 300 people had been evacuated. As a result, power was also cut to more than 80,000 people in Santiago and the provinces of Valparaiso and O'Higgins.

VLADIMIR RODAS / AFP - Getty Images

Floodwaters fill a shopping center in Santiago on April 17.

IVAN ALVARADO / Reuters

People stand in line to buy water in Santiago on April 16.

Four million people in Santiago were without tap water Sunday after unusually heavy rain pounding central Chile triggered landslides that fouled the city's water supply. They've urged residents to limit water use until the problem is resolved.

VLADIMIR RODAS / AFP - Getty Images

Police assist people on streets flooded by the Mapocho River in Santiago on April 17. City official Claudio Orrego said that while the Mapocho didn't overflow its banks, a problem with a tunnel led water to spill into the city.

PASCAL DIAZ / AFP - Getty Images

A police officer stands next to a flooded street in Santiago on April 17.

Esteban Felix / AP

Police assist people on streets flooded by the Mapocho River in Santiago on April 17.

PASCAL DIAZ / AFP - Getty Images

A police officer rescues a dog during a downpour in Santiago on April 17.

MARIO RUIZ / EPA

A car drives through a flooded street in Santiago on April 17.

Esteban Felix / AP
A loader works on a flooded street in Santiago on April 17. IVAN ALVARADO / Reuters

Floodwaters rush down a street in Santiago on April 17.

MARTIN BERNETTI / AFP - Getty Images

A man looks at a flooded structure in Santiago on April 17.

AP

A man stands next to a river during floods in Santiago on April 17.

IVAN ALVARADO / Reuters

Workers remove water from a store in a flooded street in Santiago on April 17.

IVAN ALVARADO / Reuters