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Asiana Flight 214 crashes at SFO

A Boeing 777 operated by Asiana Airlines crash landed at SFO.

Passengers evacuate from a Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft after a crash landing at San Francisco International Airport in California on July 6. The photo was provided by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah. Two were killed in the crash and more than 180 were injured. Eugene Anthony Rah via Reuters
Asiana Airlines flight 214 burns on the runway of San Francisco International Airport just moments after crashing on July 6. Dawn Siadatan / AP
Asiana Airlines flight attendant Kim Ji-yeon, left, stands near a runway with rescued passengers after Flight 214 crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport onJuly 6, in a photo taken by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah. Eugene Anthony Rah via Reuters
Passengers flee Asiana Flight 214 after it crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6. Jennifer Solis
Asiana Airlines flight attendants and rescued passengers rest on the runway after Flight 214 crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport, July 6, in a photo taken by passenger Eugene Anthony Rah. Eugene Anthony Rah/ via Reuters
A fire truck sprays water on Asiana Flight 214 after it crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6. Noah Berger / AP
Passengers wear blankets from the Salvation Army inside a guarded room after surviving a plane crash on Asiana Airlines at San Francisco International Airport, July 6. Josh Edelson / AFP - Getty Images
Passenger Marilyn McCullough took this picture aboard her flight at San Francisco International Airport that was bound for John F. Kennedy International Airport when the Asiana Airlines flight crash-landed on July 6. Marilyn McCullough
Rescue workers tend to Asiana Flight 214 after it crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport, July 6. NBC News
People view the scene of the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash landing on July 6. John Green / Zuma Press
The fuselage of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 lies on the runway after it crash landed at San Francisco International Airport, July 6. Ezra Shaw / Getty Images
Passenger Veddpal Singh searches for his wife on July 6. Singh broke his collarbone in the crash. Lipo Ching / Zuma Press
Investigators pass the detached tail and landing gear of Asiana Flight 214 on July 6, in San Francisco. Noah Berger / AP
This aerial photo shows the crash site of Asiana Flight 214 at the San Francisco International Airport, July 6. Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP
Asiana Flight 214 lies burned on the runway after it crash landed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6. Two people died on the Boeing 777 passenger plane, which departed from Seoul, South Korea, carrying a total of 307 passengers Ezra Shaw / Getty Images
Hermann Heider, from left, sits next to Alphonse Roig, wife Christine Roig, and their daughters Marine, 15, and Lara, 12, as they wait for news on their British Airways flight after Asiana Flight 214 crashed at San Francisco International Airport, July 6. Jeff Chiu / AP
A debris field is seen at the end of the runway at San Francisco International airport on July 6 after Asiana Flight 214 crash-landed. Ezra Shaw / Getty Images
An NTSB investigator looks at the Boeing 777 tail section of Asiana Flight 214 during their first site assessment on July 7 in San Francisco as they tried to determine why it crashed onto the runway the day before. NTSB
This photo released on July 11 by the National Transportation Safety Board shows the runway of San Francisco Airport after the crash landing of Asiana Flight 214 on July 6. - / AFP - Getty Images
A United Airlines plane readies for take off next to the wreckage of Asiana Flight 214 at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco on July 7. Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP
Parents of Wang Linjia, center, are comforted by parents of some other students who were on the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 when it crashed at San Francisco International Airport, while they gather and wait for news of their children at Jiangshan Middle School in Jiangshan city, in eastern China's Zhejiang province, July 7. The two people who died in the plane crash at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday have been identified as Ye Mengyuan and Wang Linjia, 16-year-old students at Jiangshan Middle School. AP
A photo provided by the National Transportation Safety Board on July 7 shows an interior view of Asiana Flight 214 in San Francisco. Ho / AFP - Getty Images
Employees of Asiana Airlines at Incheon International Airport in South Korea, talk on the phones with family members of passengers on Asiana Airlines Flight 214 that crashed on Saturday, July 7. Ahn Young-joon / AP
NTSB technician Greg Smith with the Asiana flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder in NTSB's Washington, D.C., lab on July 7. NTSB
An unidentified family member of one of two Chinese students killed in the crash of Asiana Flight 214 on Saturday, cries at the Airlines' counter as she and other family members check in a flight to San Francisco at Pudong International Airport in Shanghai on July 8. Eugene Hoshiko / AP
Kim Yoon-Ju, in wheelchair, and the other flight crew members of Asiana Flight 214, which crashed on Saturday, July 6, 2013, appear at a news conference at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco on July 10. Jeff Chiu / AP
The tail section from Asiana Airlines Flight 214 is lifted onto a flatbed truck as workers begin to clear the wreckage away at San Francisco International Airport on July 10. Two sixteen year old girls from China died and at least 180 people were injured in the crash. Monica M. Davey / EPA
People gather to mourn for the two victims of the Asiana airline plane crash at a park in Jiangshan city in eastern China's Zhejiang province on July 8. AP
Ye Mengtuan, left, and Wang Linjia, the two girls killed in the crash, pose in an undated photo with other classmates in the classroom in eastern China's Zhejiang province. AP
The president and CEO of Asiana Airlines, Yoon Young-Doo arrives at San Francisco Airport International Airport July 9. Yoon was to meet with U.S. investigators and survivors of the plane crash that killed two people and injured more than 180. Jed Jacobsohn / Reuters
South Korean students light candles during a candlelight vigil to mourn the deaths of the two Chinese victims who died in a Asiana Airlines plane crash in Seoul on July 11. Lee Jin-Man / AP