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Flooding and landslides hit Mexico after hurricanes

Mexican authorities scrambled to launch an air lift to evacuate tens of thousands of tourists stranded amid floods in the resort of Acapulco and deliver relief supplies following a pair of deadly storms.

Damage caused to the rail tracks in El Zapotillo by the overflowing of the neighboring river, in the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, on Sept. 19, 2013. Deaths from floods and landslides battering Mexico neared 100 on Thursday as a fresh hurricane hit the northwest and rescuers faced a risky mission in a village buried in mud. Fernando Brito / AFP - Getty Images
An aerial view of the landslide that buried part of La Pintada village, Guerrero state, after heavy rains hit the area, on Sept. 19. Pedro Pardo / AFP - Getty Images
Nancy Gomez, 21, an injured resident of La Pintada, and her one-year-old baby, receive medical attention in a shelter at the Convention Center in Acapulco on Sept. 19. Federal police rescued more than 300 people from La Pintada after it was hit by a landslide Monday afternoon, but officials said at least 58 people were missing and presumed dead. Gomez said that she heard a strange sound and went to look out the doorway of her family's house, her baby clutched in her arms. She saw the ground move, then felt a jolt from behind as her father tried to push her to safety. She never saw him again. Michael Weissenstein / AP
The remains of a church tower after a landslide in La Pintada on Sept. 19. Ronaldo Schemidt / AFP - Getty Images
Tourists rest while waiting for a chance to board an outbound Mexican Air Force plane at the Pie de La Cuesta military base in Acapulco on Sept. 18. Mexican authorities scrambled to launch an air lift to evacuate tens of thousands of tourists stranded amid floods in the resort of Acapulco following a pair of deadly storms. Claudio Vargas / AFP - Getty Images
Tourists being evacuated at Acapulco airport on Sept. 19. Secretary Office Of Communications via EPA
A car lays buried in mud after flooding triggered by Tropical Storm Manuel as residents try to clean up their neighborhood in Chilpancingo on Sept. 19. Manuel, the same storm that devastated Acapulco, gained hurricane force and rolled into the northern state of Sinaloa on Thursday before starting to weaken. Alejandrino Gonzalez / AP
Damage caused in El Zapotillo by the overflowing of the neighboring river on Sept. 19. Fernando Brito / AFP - Getty Images
Evacuees unload food boxes from a Mexican Navy helicopter in Acapulco on Sept. 18. Claudio Vargas / AFP - Getty Images
Rescued people are taken to safety by Mexican Federal Police officers on an inflatable dinghy in a flooded street of Acapulco on Sept. 18. Ronaldo Schemidt / AFP - Getty Images
Local residents wade through a flooded street in Acapulco on Sept. 18. Ronaldo Schemidt / AFP - Getty Images
A car lies partially submerged in floodwater at the golf course of a hotel in the flooded beach resort of Acapulco Sept. 18. Looting broke out in Acapulco on Wednesday as the government struggled to reach tens of thousands of people cut off by flooding that had claimed at least 80 lives. Tomas Bravo / Reuters
A man uses a makeshift zip line to cross a river after a bridge collapsed under the force of the rains caused by Tropical Storm Manuel near the town of Petaquillas on Sept. 18. The death toll from devastating twin storms climbed to 80 on Wednesday as isolated areas reported to the outside world. Mexican officials said that a massive landslide in the mountains north of Acapulco could drive the number of confirmed dead even higher. Alejandrino Gonzalez / AP
A man wades through a flooded street in Acapulco on Sept. 18. Ronaldo Schemidt / AFP - Getty Images
People stand on the edge of a collapsed bridge as they wait to ferry their goods via a boat across the Papagayos River, south of Acapulco, near Lomas de Chapultepec, on Sept. 18. Eduardo Verdugo / AP
Soldiers and police stand guard near floodwaters outside a store in Acapulco Sept. 18. Looting broke out in the flooded Mexican beach resort of Acapulco on Wednesday as the government struggled to reach tens of thousands of people cut off by flooding that had claimed at least 80 lives. Tomas Bravo / Reuters
People wade through waist-high water in a store's parking, looking for valuables, south of Acapulco, in Punta Diamante on Sept. 18. Mexico was hit by the one-two punch of twin storms over the weekend, and the storm that soaked Acapulco on Sunday - Manuel -re-formed into a tropical storm Wednesday, threatening to bring more flooding to the country's northern coast. With roads blocked by landslides, rockslides, floods and collapsed bridges, Acapulco was cut off from road transport. Eduardo Verdugo / AP
Residents receive food rations handed out by the military in Acapulco Sept. 18. Looting broke out in the flooded Mexican beach resort of Acapulco as the government on Wednesday struggled to reach tens of thousands of people cut off by some of the worst storm damage in decades. Stores were ransacked by looters who carried off everything from televisions to Christmas decorations, after floodwaters wreaked havoc in the Pacific port that has borne the brunt of torrential rains. Tomas Bravo / Reuters
Inhabitants cross a collapsed bridge assisted by members of the Mexican Army in Cocuya de Beni­tez, Guerrero state, on Sept. 18.. Francisca Meza / EPA
Aerial view of a bridge swept away by heavy rains in Acapulco on Sept. 17. Claudio Vargas / AFP - Getty Images
People wait as a helicopter lands on a collapsed road in Coyuca de Benitez on Sept. 17. Mexico's famous beach resort of Acapulco was in chaos on Tuesday as hotels rationed food for thousands of stranded tourists and floodwaters swallowed homes and cars after some of the most damaging storms in decades. The rains were spawned by two major storms that converged on Mexico from the Pacific and the Gulf, triggering flash floods that washed away homes and landslides in eastern Mexico. Reuters
Residents wait for help in Acapulco on Sept. 17. - / AFP - Getty Images
An aerial view of a flooded neighbourhood is seen in Acapulco on Sept. 17. Looting broke out in the flooded Mexican beach resort of Acapulco as the government struggled to reach tens of thousands of people cut off by flooding. Stores were ransacked by looters who carried off everything from televisions to Christmas decorations after floodwaters wreaked havoc in the Pacific port that has experienced some of the worst storm damage to hit Mexico in years. Stringer/mexico / Reuters