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Navy Yard shooting

A gunman opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington D.C., killing 12 people.

Aron Alexis moves through the hallways of Building 197 on Sept. 16, 2013, carrying the Remington 870 shotgun in this image from surveillance video. Shortly after his arrival in the building and over the course of approximately one hour, Alexis used the Remington 870 shotgun and a Beretta handgun he obtained during the course of his shooting to kill 12 victims and wound four surviving victims before he was shot and killed by law enforcement officers. Investigation to date has determined that Alexis acted alone. FBI
Police respond to the report of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 16. Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images
Police respond to the report of a shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., Sept. 16. Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images
A police helicopter flies over police walking on the roof of a building as they respond to a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 16. Joshua Roberts / Reuters
In this photo, which The AP obtained from Don Andres, shooting victim Vishnu Pandit is assisted on the sidewalk while awaiting the arrival of emergency medical personnel after coworkers took him by car from the Washington Navy Yard to receive medical attention on Sept. 16, in Washington. Pandit died of his injuries. Don Andres / AP
Police respond to the report of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 16. Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images
Military security looks from a nearby rooftop toward Navy Yard following a shooting in Washington on Sept. 16. Saul Loeb / AFP - Getty Images
Law enforcement officers respond to the scene of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16. Jason Reed / Reuters
Evacuees raise their hands as they are escorted from the scene of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington D.C., Sept. 16. Alex Wong / Getty Images
People stand outside a Starbucks Coffee shop that has been closed as police respond to a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 16. Joshua Roberts / Reuters
A U.S. Park Police helicopter removes a man in a basket from the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 16. Earlier in the day, the U.S. Navy said it was searching for an active shooter at the Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters, where about 3,000 people work. Jonathan Ernst / Reuters
Navy Yard employee Omar Grant, right, leads a blind colleague to safety after the deadly shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C, on Sept. 16. Chris Moody / Yahoo News
A police boat patrols near the scene of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 16, 2013, in Washington. Evan Vucci / AP
A police officer inspects vehicles with his canine at a parking lot outside the Washington Navy Yard as he responds to a shooting, Sept. 16. Alex Wong / Getty Images
A family member of a Navy Yard worker who was evacuated during the shooting arrives hoping to find him at a makeshift shelter at the Nationals Park baseball stadium near the naval installation in Washington, Sept. 16. Jonathan Ernst / Reuters
People step out of buses after they arrived at parking lot B of Nationals Park which has been set up as a gathering point for families of the Navy Yard shootings on Sept. 16. Mandel Ngan / AFP - Getty Images
Family and friends wait to greet staff of the Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters as they are bused from the Washington Navy Yard to Nationals Park, in Washington, Sept. 16. Jacquelyn Martin / AP
Miriam Rogal and her daughter Olivia are directed by Homeland Security police on where to park and wait for Rogal's husband, who works in the building in Washington, D.C. He called her to tell her he was all right. Andre Chung / MCT via Getty Images
A man and woman embrace while reuniting at a gathering point for family members of Navy Yard employees that was set up inside Nationals Park in the wake of the shooting on Sept. 16 in Washington, D.C. Jonathan Ernst / Reuters
Cathy Lanier, chief of police of Washington, D.C., and Vincent Gray, mayor of Washington, D.C., speak during a news conference as police respond to a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington on Sept. 16. Joshua Roberts / Reuters
The FBI released a poster seeking more information on Aaron Alexis, who police believe was a gunman at the Washington Navy Yard shooting on Sept. 16 and was killed after he fired on a police officer. At least one gunman launched an attack inside the Washington D.C. facility, spraying gunfire on office workers in the cafeteria and in the hallways at the heavily secured military installation, authorities said. FBI via AP
U.S. Capitol Police personnel keep watch on the East Plaza of the Capitol as the investigation continues to the shooting at the nearby Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 16, in Washington. J. Scott Applewhite / AP
President Barack Obama walks out to speak in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex, Sept. 16 in Washington about the Washington Navy Yard shooting. Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP
A small group holds a candle light vigil on Freedom Plaza to remember the victims of the shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, Sept. 16, in Washington. J. Scott Applewhite / AP
The American flags surrounding the Washington Monument fly at half-staff as ordered by President Barack Obama following the deadly shooting Monday at the Washington Navy Yard, Tuesday morning, Sept. 17. J. Scott Applewhite / AP
Washington Naval Yard seen from Nationals Park on Sept. 17 in Washington, D.C. Yesterday 13 people were shot and killed by a gunman, including the shooter, at the Navy Yard. Patrick Smith / Getty Images
Employees report for duty at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington the day after 12 people were killed in a shooting. John Makely / NBC News
A Navy employee who did not want to be identified lays flowers near the main gate to the Washington Navy Yard. John Makely / NBC News
Clockwise from top left: John Roger Johnson, Frank Kohler, Vishnu (Kisan) B. Pandit, Richard Michael "Mike" Ridgell, Arthur Daniels, Martin "Marty" Bodrog, Kenneth Proctor and Kathy Gaarde. Family photos
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, right, and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, second from right, present a wreath at the Navy Memorial in Washington to remember the victims of Monday's deadly shooting at the Washington Navy Yard, on Sept. 17. J. Scott Applewhite / AP
FBI personnel unload boxes out of a truck in front of building 197 near the main gate of the Navy Yard in Washington, on Sept. 17. Shawn Thew / EPA
Policemen stand guard outside the home of Cathleen Alexis, the mother of alleged Washington Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis, on Sept. 17 in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York City. Andrew Burton / Getty Images
Neal Heslin, left, father of a Sandy Hook Elementary School victim, speaks to a group of supporters at a candle light vigil organized by Eddie Weingart, center, across the street from the Washington Navy Yard. Weingart is founder of the End Gun Violence Project. John Makely / NBC News
Etchings on the side of Alexis' Remington 870 shotgun read "Better off this way" and "My ELF weapon." FBI