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Typhoon Haiyan batters Philippines

One of the most powerful storms ever recorded killed thousands of people in the central Philippines, with huge waves sweeping away entire coastal villages and devastating the region's main city.

Desperate villagers who have yet to receive any relief aid, react as a U.S. helicopter arrives to deliver aid in a remote village off Guiuan, Eastern Samar, in central Philippines on Nov. 20, 2013. Edgar Su / Reuters
Workers pause to look at a portrait of a boy on Nov. 20, in Tacloban. Dondi Tawatao / Getty Images
A man rebuilds his house amid the rubble of destroyed homes in Tacloban on Nov. 20. Odd Andersen / AFP - Getty Images
Children play on a balcony at the Tacloban Astrodome evacuation center on Nov. 20, in Tacloban. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
The mother of a premature baby sits by her cot in the children's and maternity ward at the Eastern Visayas Medical Center on Nov. 20, in Leyte, Philippines. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
A man fans flames on a fire Tanauan on Nov. 19, in Leyte, Philippines. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
A young man walks through debris with a broken guitar towards a ship where he is sleeping in a particularly badly damaged part of Tacloban on Nov. 19, in Leyte, Philippines. Several families who lost their homes to the ship as it ran aground have set up temporary accommodation in the ship itself. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
Survivors of Super Typhoon Haiyan take part in a religious procession in Tolosa on the eastern Philippine island of Leyte on Nov. 18. The United Nations estimates that 13 million people were affected by the typhoon, with around 1.9 million losing their homes. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
A man stands underneath a tanker which ran aground and came to rest amongst debris in Tacloban on Nov. 17. Typhoon Haiyan has been described as one of the most powerful typhoons ever to hit land. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
The retired Archbishop of Washington Theodore McCarrick prays during a mass inside a damaged cathedral in the typhoon-devastated town of Palo, Leyte province, on Nov. 17. Ritchie B. Tongo / EPA
Typhoon Haiyan survivors play basketball in Tacloban, Philippines, on Nov. 17. They found the hoop in the ruins of their obliterated neighborhood. They propped up the backboard with broken wood beams and rusty nails scavenged from vast mounds of storm-blasted homes. A crowd gathered around. And on one of the few stretches of road here that wasn't overflowing with debris, they played basketball. David Guttenfelder / AP
Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan rush to grab fresh water delivered by a U.S. military helicopter to their isolated village north of Tacloban on Nov. 17. Damir Sagolj / Reuters
Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan stand in line for drinking water in Palo, on the outskirts of Tacloban, on Nov. 17. Aid has been slow reaching the millions of affected people, but an enormous international relief operation picked up momentum over the weekend, bringing food, water and medical supplies and airlifting basic necessities to isolated communities. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
A survivor lights candles on the makeshift graves of his father and uncle in Palo on Nov. 16. Residents decided to bury bodies of relatives and unknown people killed during Typhoon Haiyan in the field because they started to decay and might pose a health risk. Aaron Favila / AP
A military truck makes its way toward the airport as a curfew takes effect on Nov. 16 in Leyte, Philippines. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
Rescue workers search for bodies in the rubble in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on Nov. 16 in Tacloban. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images
Typhoon Haiyan survivors struggle for food during a distribution as they wait for their turn to board a military airplane at the airport in Tacloban on Nov. 16. Mast Irham / EPA
Typhoon victims rush to get relief goods from a U.S. Navy Sea Hawk helicopter in Salcedo, Samar Island, Philippines, on Nov. 16. International aid began to trickle into some of the hardest-hit areas of the typhoon-ravaged Philippines, more than a week after the most powerful storm ever to hit land devastated the islands and killed thousands. Francis R. Malasig / EPA
A teddy bear is hung out to dry in a part of Tolosa devastated by Typhoon Haiyan on Nov. 16. John Javellana / Reuters
A young man bathes in the rubble of his destroyed house in the devastated town of Tanuan, south of Tacloban, Philippines, on Nov. 15. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images
Despite thick oil slicking his hands, 14-year-old Giray Boreros uses a hacksaw to collect scrap iron in the devastated fishing town of Estancia, Philippines, on Nov. 15. Typhoon Haiyan hit the town with such force that a barge ran aground, spilling approximately 1.4 million liters of oil into the bay, according to the town's mayor.
Boreros' family narrowly escaped the storm in their shoreline home, "We hid inside, and we were so scared," he says. Struggling to find food, Boreros sells the scrap iron to feed himself and his younger sister So far, he's sold 100 pesos worth, the equivalent of about 2 U.S. dollars. Jim Seida / NBC News
People line up for relief handouts outside the Tacloban Stadium on Nov. 15, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan which ripped through Philippines over the weekend has been described as on of the most powerful typhoons ever to hit land, leaving thousands dead and hundreds of thousands homeless. Chris McGrath / Getty Images
Air Crewman Heath surveys the devastation from a U.S. Navy helicopter attached to the aircraft carrier USS George Washington over a village north of Tacloban on Nov. 15. USS George Washington and other U.S. ships were sent to bolster relief efforts in the Philippines. Mark Ralston / AFP - Getty Images
A body of a typhoon victim is washed ashore in Leyte Province, Philippines, Nov. 15. Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
A ship pushed inland by the typhoon sits near damaged buildings in the devastated city of Tacloban on Nov. 15. Nic Bothma / EPA
Francisco Quiza is treated in Tacloban Hospital on Nov. 15, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
A typhoon victim checks on her husband as she keeps him alive by manualy pumping air into his lungs following his leg amputation and an infection at the Divine Word hospital, which still operates without electrical power on Nov. 15, the 7th day of the Typhoon Haiyan disaster in Tacloban. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
Maria Getapa holds her weeping younger brother Jean as medics attend to their dehydrated and exhausted mother after waiting for more than four days at the airport for evacuation from Tacloban on Nov. 15. Nic Bothma / EPA
People wait for flights out of Tacloban Airport in the early morning of Nov. 15. Chris McGrath / Getty Images
Filipino workers fill a large grave with body bags at the Basper public cemetery in the typhoon-hit city of Tacloban, central Philippines on Nov. 14. Aaron Favila / AP
Children run towards a U.S. military aircraft as it arrives to distribute aid to Typhoon Haiyan survivors in the destroyed town of Guiuan, Philippines, on Nov. 14. Aid was beginning to reach some of the half-million people displaced by Typhoon Haiyan that tore across several islands in eastern Philippines, killing thousands of people. David Guttenfelder / AP
Dominador Artoge holds his duck on Nov. 14 which he rescued as it swam ashore following the typhoon that lashed Tacloban. Artoge's family named the duck "Landa," (for Yolanda), the local name of the typhoon. Bullit Marquez / AP
An aerial view of a demolished coastal town on Eastern Samar Island is seen on Nov. 14 in Leyte, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan which ripped through Philippines over the weekend has been described as one of the most powerful typhoons ever to hit land, leaving thousands dead and hundreds of thousands homeless. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
People line up in the rain for a rescue flight at Tacloban Airport on Nov. 14. Countries all over the world have pledged relief aid to help support those affected by the typhoon, however damage to the airport and roads have made moving the aid into the most affected areas very difficult. Dan Kitwood / Getty Images
A resident looks out from his home in a devastated area of Tacloban City on Nov. 14. Chris McGrath / Getty Images
Firemen carry corpses of victims of Typhoon Haiyan during a mass burial on the outskirts of Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on Nov. 14. Scores of decaying bodies were being taken to mass graves as overwhelmed Philippines authorities grappled with disposal of the dead and the living begged for help after the typhoon disaster. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
Residents carry a coffin containing the body of a victim of Typhoon Haiyan during a funeral in Tanauan, Leyte, central Philippines, on Nov. 14. Erik De Castro / Reuters
A young boy sits on the ruins of a building amid scenes of devastation in Tacloban on Nov. 13. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images
Soldiers help a typhoon survivor after she collapsed while waiting in line to board a military transport plane from the damaged Tacloban airport on Nov. 13. Bullit Marquez / AP
The dead body of a typhoon victim lies on a street in Tacloban on Nov. 13, five days after Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
Residents walk past scenes of devastation in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on Nov. 13 in Tacloban, Leyte, Philippines. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images
An aerial view shows signs requesting help and food amid the destruction left from Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal town of Tanawan on Nov. 13. Wally Santana / AP
An elderly woman and an injured man are carried to a waiting C-130 aircraft during the evacuation of hundreds of survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban. Four days after the typhoon devastated the region, many have nothing left, are without food or power and most lost their homes. Paula Bronstein / Getty Images
Two brothers wheel their grandmother in a shopping cart to the evacuation area of Tacloban airport on Nov. 12, amid the massive destruction left by Typhoon Haiyan. The typhoon, one of the strongest storms on record, slammed into six central Philippine islands on Friday leaving a wide swath of destruction and thousands of people dead. Wally Santana / AP
Dead bodies are removed from a church to be taken to a morgue in Tacloban on Nov. 12. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
A member of the Filipino military carries an injured evacuee in Leyte on Nov. 12. Dondi Tawatao / Getty Images
A soldier stands in the damaged control tower of Tacloban airport on Nov. 12. Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
A survivor from Tacloban, which was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan, sits on the ground after disembarking a Philippine Air Force C-130 aircraft at the Villamor Airbase in Manila on Nov. 12. Authorities said at least 9.7 million people in 41 provinces were affected by the typhoon, known as Haiyan elsewhere in Asia but called Yolanda in the Philippines. It was likely the deadliest natural disaster to beset this poor Southeast Asian nation. Vincent Yu / AP
A scene of devastation on Victory Island in Eastern Samar province on Nov. 11. Ted Aljibe / AFP - Getty Images
Residents queue up to receive treatment and relief supplies at Tacloban airport. Bullit Marquez / AP
Women wash clothes next to a ship washed ashore, in the typhoon-devastated city of Tacloban on Nov. 11. Local authorities appealed for calm after one of the world’s strongest typhoons left survivors desperate for food and water in areas affected by the storm. Francis R. Malasig / EPA
An aerial view of the devastated town of Guiuan on Nov. 11. Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal village of Capiz carry sacks containing relief goods delivered by the Armed Forces of the Philippines. Tara Yap / AFP - Getty Images
Survivors in their damaged house Nov. 10 after Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban City. One of the most powerful storms ever recorded killed at least 10,000 people in the central Philippines, with huge waves sweeping away entire coastal villages and devastating the region's main city. Typhoon Haiyan destroyed about 70 to 80 percent of the area in its path as it tore through Leyte province on Friday. Romeo Ranoco / Reuters
Residents cover their nose from the smell of dead bodies in Tacloban City, on Nov. 10. The city remains littered with debris from damaged homes as many complain of shortage of food, water and no electricity since the Typhoon Haiyan slammed into their province. Bullit Marquez / AP
Filipinos carrying grocery items walk out of a store in Tacloban, on Nov. 10. Francis R. Malasig / EPA
A Filipino store owner aims a pistol and warns looters trying to enter his store in Tacloban, on Nov. 10. Francis R. Malasig / EPA
Survivors stand among debris and ruins of houses on Nov. 10 after Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban City. Erik De Castro / Reuters
A boy stands amid rubble in the typhoon-devastated city of Tacloban on Nov. 10. Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
Survivors walk past a damaged town after strong winds brought by Super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban on Nov. 9. Romeo Ranoco / Reuters
Residents return to their houses after leaving an evacuation site in the aftermath of Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, on Nov. 9. Noel Celis / AFP - Getty Images
Filipinos carry a victim of the super typhoon in the devastated city of Tacloban on Nov. 9. Francis R. Malasig / EPA
A mother weeps beside her dead son at a chapel in Tacloban on Nov. 9. Noel Celis / AFP - Getty Images
Typhoon Haiyan is seen from the International Space Station on Nov. 9. Karen L. Nyberg / NASA via AP
A house is engulfed by the storm surge from typhoon Haiyan in Albay province, Nov.8. Nelson Salting / AP
A mother takes refuge with her children as Typhoon Haiyan hits Cebu City, central Philippines, Nov. 8. Zander Casas / Reuters