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2016 Conventions

A Subdued Elizabeth Warren Makes Clinton’s Case Against Trump

Elizabeth Warren to Republicans: This November We are Coming for You 0:57

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. — Massachusetts. Sen. Elizabeth Warren delivered a notably subdued speech at the Democratic National Convention, attacking Donald Trump on substance but omitting many of the sharply-worded attacks she's become known for throughout the course of the primary.

Warren, the liberal darling and one-time vice presidential prospect, framed the election as a choice between Trump, whom she portrayed as a selfish and divisive figure who played Americans for his own gain, and Clinton, who she said cared about the working class and would fight for liberal priorities.

"On one side is a man who inherited a fortune from his father and kept it going by cheating people and skipping out on debts. A man who has never sacrificed anything for anyone. A man who cares only for himself — every minute of every day," she said of Trump.

Image: US Senator Elizabeth Warren
U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks at the DNC. NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP - Getty Images

"On the other side is one of the smartest, toughest, most tenacious people on the planet — a woman who fights for children, for women, for health care, for human rights, a woman who fights for all of us, and who is strong enough to win those fights," Warren added of Clinton.

Warren ticked off a litany of attacks on Trump's business record, noting he once said he'd profit from the housing market crash and charging he "set up a fake university to make money while cheating people and taking their life savings," an attack on his for-profit real-estate courses known as Trump University.

She also slammed him for lacking policy proposals, telling the crowd if they heard any policies during Trump's Republican National Convention speech, "other than talking about building a stupid wall, which will NEVER get built."

And Warren accused Trump of attempting to win "by fanning the flames of fear and hatred," and framing his vision for America as one of "fear and hate. An America where we all break apart."

She went on to insist: "The American people are not falling for it! We've seen this ugliness before, and we're not going to be Donald Trump's hate-filled America. Not now, not ever!"

But for the politician who's emerged as the Democratic Party's attack dog for her willingness to go after Trump with fierce rhetoric — Warren's called Trump a "racist bully" and a "small insecure money-grubber," as the two have feuded throughout the primary — she largely avoided such attacks on the GOP nominee, despite the fact that, just hours before she spoke, Trump dismissed Warren as "Pocahontas," questioning her claimed Native American heritage. Warren instead focused on policy, delivering just one sharp jab dismissing his campaign as a "late-night Trump infomercial."

"Trump's entire campaign is just one more late-night Trump infomercial. Hand over your money, your jobs, your children's future, and The ­­­­­­Great Trump Hot Air Machine will reveal all the answers. And, for one low, low price, he'll even throw in a goofy hat," she said.

And she was somewhat overshadowed by First Lady Michelle Obama's speech just before her own, a rousing call for unity that brought the entire convention to its feet.

Warren, too, called for Democratic unity to defeat Trump, offering an olive branch to Sanders at the very outset of her speech: "Bernie reminds us what Democrats fight for every day!" she said, and thanked him.

But she was rebuffed by dissatisfied Sanders delegates on the floor, some of whom chanted "sell-out!" and "Goldman Sachs" as she spoke.