Feedback
News
Brexit Referendum

Financial Times Reader Comment Sums Up Disappointed Brits’ Feelings

An articulate reader comment lamenting the outcome of the Brexit referendum has been retweeted tens of thousands of times by pro-Remain supporters, who say it sums up their heartache.

The comment left by 25-year-old university research associate and journalist Nicholas Barrett on the Financial Times website outlines "three tragedies":

"Firstly, it was the working classes who voted for us to leave because they were economically disregarded and it is they who will suffer the most in the short term from the dearth of jobs and investment," he wrote. "Secondly, the younger generation has lost the right to live and work in 27 other countries."

"Thirdly and perhaps most significantly, we now live in a post-factual democracy," he continued. "Can anybody tell me the last time a prevailing culture of anti-intellectualism has lead to anything other than bigotry?"

A Twitter user tweeted a screenshot of the comment, writing, "This comment from a reader of the FT puts it better than I ever could." It has been retweeted more than 24,000 times, and has 17,000 likes.

The comment is signed with just a first name, Nicholas. Barrett, who is from South London but lives in Florence, Italy, confirmed to NBC News that he had penned it. The comment is posted on his Tumblr blog as well.

Barrett said he was shocked by the referendum results.

"At the start of the night, everyone was saying that it was going to be Remain, and the Leave campaign had kind of given up and conceded," the 25-year-old Briton told NBC News. "I went to bed confident."

When he woke up to the news at 5 a.m., Barrett said he was so upset, he couldn't concentrate.

"So I just walked out to the street, and I got to work two hours early, and I thought, I need to get things off my chest," he said.

It was then that he wrote the comment on the FT's website — which he never expected to receive such an overwhelming response.

"I think it must be some kind of therapeutic outlet for people who feel let down," he said.

Barrett said he feared for himself and his British friends who work in other EU countries.

"We can lose the right to live and work here. If we were thinking of building our futures here, that would be very difficult," he said.

Twitter users hailed Barrett's comment as "superb" and "sage" and many said while they were at a loss for words, Barrett perfectly expressed their concerns.

Read his full comment below:

“A quick note on the first three tragedies. Firstly, it was the working classes who voted for us to leave because they were economically disregarded, and it is they who will suffer the most in the short term. They have merely swapped one distant and unreachable elite for another. Secondly, the younger generation has lost the right to live and work in 27 other countries. We will never know the full extent of the lost opportunities, friendships, marriages and experiences we will be denied. Freedom of movement was taken away by our parents, uncles, and grandparents in a parting blow to a generation that was already drowning in the debts of our predecessors. Thirdly and perhaps most significantly, we now live in a post-factual democracy. When the facts met the myths they were as useless as bullets bouncing off the bodies of aliens in a HG Wells novel. When Michael Gove said, ‘The British people are sick of experts,’ he was right. But can anybody tell me the last time a prevailing culture of anti-intellectualism has led to anything other than bigotry?” Nicholas