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Warrior Baby: Last Ebola Patient Treated in Guinea

The Guinean Ministry of Health has started the countdown to the end of Ebola in Guinea with Nubia, a newborn who survived the deadly infection.

. The current Ebola epidemic, the worst known outbreak in history, began in Guinea's forest region nearly two years ago. More than 28,000 people were infected and more than 11,000 of them died, nearly all of them in West African neighbors Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The last known Ebola case in Guinea is a three-week-old girl named Nubia. She has recovered from the virus, but as she is the first infected baby to have recuperated, she will continue to receive specialized medical support before going back home.

ABOVE: Nubia is visited by her uncle Adama at the clinic in Conakry.

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders

. Doctors Without Borders staff care for Nubia.
Nubia's mother died the day she gave birth to Nubia at the treatment center.

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders

. Nubia's recovery means Guinea can begin its 42-day countdown to declaring an end to the outbreak in the country. Sierra Leone was declared free of the virus on Nov. 7. Liberia had been declared Ebola-free but a new case was discovered on Nov. 20.

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders

. Health workers put on their protective gear before entering the high-risk zone at the treatment center in Conakry.

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders

. A health worker is disinfected with chlorine by another worker as they leave the high-risk zone at the clinic.

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders

. Doctors Without Borders staff care for Nubia.

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders

. Nubia is visited by her uncle Adama.
"I felt such emotion when I saw her," said Adama. "Last time we visited her [when she had Ebola] she looked so different. Now she looks so healthy. I'm going to go and tell the rest of the family right now. We didn't think she could survive. But she is in good hands. And she is a warrior."

Tommy Trenchard / Doctors Without Borders