Missing Jet

Hampered by Sea Fog, Another Day of Searching Ends Without Result


Another day of searching for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean ended without much luck, Australian authorities said Sunday.

In a release, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority said the search concluded Sunday night (local time) and there were "no sightings of significance."

The agency said that earlier in the day the operations were hampered by sea fog, particularly in the western areas.

Flying Office Peter Moore, with the Royal Australian Air Force, told reporters after returning from the search that weather conditions were less than favorable, with a low cloud ceiling at about 500 feet, fog and showers.

He described the situation as "quite trying," but said his crew was "highly motivated" and were "at least going to try to achieve some answers for the family of friends of flight MH370."

He said the crew was "well-trained in flying in marginal weather conditions, like we found today."

A total of eight aircraft and the Australian Navy's HMAS Success took part in Sunday's search effort in a cumulative 23,000 square mile search area, AMSA said.

The search will resume Monday morning, when two large Chinese military Ilyushin IL-76 aircraft and Japanese P-3C aircraft will join the operation.


France has new satellite images showing possible debris in southern search zone, officials said Sunday, but so far there has been no solid evidence of the whereabouts of the plane that disappeared two weeks ago with 239 passengers and crew on board.

— Hasani Gittens
Image: Search Continues For Possible Malaysian Airliner Debris Found In Indian Ocean
Orion planes sit on the tarmac at Pearce air base on March 23, 2014 in Perth, Australia. Matt Jelonek / Getty Images