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Porn Site Blocks North Carolina Visitors Over Controversial LGBT Law

As major companies continue to pull out of North Carolina over its controversial LGBT law, porn enthusiasts are the latest to be put in a bind. Residents with an IP address registered in that state have been blocked from accessing the online sex site XHamster.

"We will not stand by and pump revenue into a system that promotes this type of garbage," said the adult site in a statement. "We respect all sexualities and embrace them.”

North Carolina starts to see economic damage from anti-bias law 2:12

Mike Kulich, spokesman for XHamster, stressed the hypocrisy inherent in the state's new law, pointing out that last month the site had "400,000 hits for the term ‘Transsexual’ from North Carolina alone. People from that state searched ‘Gay’ 319,907 times.”

Users who were hoping to view the site's naughty content will see only a blacked-out screen. “Judging by the stats of what you North Carolinians watch, we feel this punishment is a severe one," said XHamster, adding that the site will eventually replace the blackout with a petition to repeal the law.

The legislation, signed by Governor Pat McCrory last month, prohibits local governments from blocking anti-discriminatory legislation that could protect people on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Backlash has been swift and fierce: PayPal canceled a $3.6 million expansion plan that would have brought 400 jobs to the state, Bruce Springsteen and Bryan Adams canceled shows, Hollywood called for a complete ban on filming in the state, and several governors issued executive orders nixing any state-funded travel to North Carolina.

Deutsche Bank is the latest corporate giant to cancel or postpone investment in the Tar Heel State, announcing on Tuesday that it has frozen plans to create 250 new jobs at its tech center in Cary.

“We take our commitment to building inclusive work environments seriously,” said John Cryan, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Deutsche Bank, in a press release. “We’re proud of our operations and employees in Cary and regret that as a result of this legislation we are unwilling to include North Carolina in our U.S. expansion plans for now.”

Tourism, one of the state's major industries, is also taking a gigantic hit. At last count, 13 conventions have canceled plans for Charlotte, and 29 more have cold feet about hosting events in the state.

“Our city has worked incredibly hard to build a thriving visitor economy over the last 20 years, which has welcomed major events and conventions that greatly give back to the city and the state of North Carolina's economy and overall quality of life,” Tom Murray, CEO of Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority, told NBC News in a statement. “This issue is in danger of setting us back from the progress we've made in positioning Charlotte as an attractive, inclusive destination.”

The financial impact is significant: Cancellations in the greater Raleigh area alone are expected to lead to a loss of $24 million for the state, according to the News & Observer.

No word yet as to whether media mogul Oprah Winfrey still intends to give the keynote speech at Johnson C. Smith University's spring commencement ceremony in Charlotte on May 15.