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No Plan Yet for That $1 Trillion Investment. Status: Stalled.

President Donald Trump vowed big investments in American infrastructure at little cost to taxpayers, but the issue seems to have largely fallen off the White House's radar.

Detailed plans for the trillion-dollar investment the president promised were due by the end of the third quarter, but have not yet materialized.

His administration threw its support behind public-private partnerships, but in September The Wall Street Journal reported that Trump told lawmakers he felt those partnerships were “more trouble than they’re worth,” causing confusion around his administration's agenda.

The last time the White House dedicated serious political capital to the issue — throwing support behind privatizing air traffic control — it was Infrastructure Week, the White House’s counterprogramming to the testimony of former FBI chief James Comey. But the president steamrolled Infrastructure Week with off-topic speeches and tweets, including one appointing a new head of the FBI. A few weeks later, Congress reauthorized the Federal Aviation Administration, keeping air traffic control under federal purview in a direct contradiction to Trump, who suggested privatizing it.

Trump has kept his promise to approve two oil pipelines, however: Keystone XL and Dakota Access. Dakota is open, while Keystone has yet to find a buyer. But neither are expected to create the number of jobs Trump says they will.

 

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No Plan Yet for That $1 Trillion Investment. Status: Stalled.

President Donald Trump vowed big investments in American infrastructure at little cost to taxpayers, but the issue seems to have largely fallen off the White House's radar.

Detailed plans for the trillion-dollar investment the president promised were due by the end of the third quarter, but have not yet materialized.

His administration threw its support behind public-private partnerships, but in September The Wall Street Journal reported that Trump told lawmakers he felt those partnerships were “more trouble than they’re worth,” causing confusion around his administration's agenda.

The last time the White House dedicated serious political capital to the issue — throwing support behind privatizing air traffic control — it was Infrastructure Week, the White House’s counterprogramming to the testimony of former FBI chief James Comey. But the president steamrolled Infrastructure Week with off-topic speeches and tweets, including one appointing a new head of the FBI. A few weeks later, Congress reauthorized the Federal Aviation Administration, keeping air traffic control under federal purview in a direct contradiction to Trump, who suggested privatizing it.

Trump has kept his promise to approve two oil pipelines, however: Keystone XL and Dakota Access. Dakota is open, while Keystone has yet to find a buyer. But neither are expected to create the number of jobs Trump says they will.

 


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