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North Dakota GOP unleashes new line of attack on Heitkamp

The North Dakota Republican Party is unleashing a new line of attack against Senator Democratic Heidi Heitkamp in a new ad out Tuesday. 

The ad, shared first with NBC News, says Heitkamp "did nothing" to defend law enforcement or protect property rights during Dakota Access Pipeline protests in the state in 2016. 

North Dakota GOP spokesman Jake Wilkins said in a statement that "Heitkamp sat on the sidelines as violence escalated, property was destroyed, and the lives of North Dakota law enforcement officers were put in harms way."

Heitkamp's campaign pushed back, citing an award she received from the Morton County Sheriff's office and the Morton County Commission "in recognition of outstanding and dedicated service to the citizens of Morton County during the Dakota Access Pipeline Protest.” And a local rancher impacted by the protests, Steve Tomac, told NBC he remembers Heitkamp as "very involved" in the communities impacted by DAPL.

Native Americans and environmental activists tried to block construction of the pipeline, resulting in hundreds of arrests at Standing Rock. The Trump administration gave the final go-ahead to the controversial project in January 2017.

Heitkamp is facing off against Republican Rep. Kevin Cramer in November in one of the most-watched contests of this election season. Polling has been scarce in the state, but a Fox News poll from early September showed Cramer up 48-44 over Heitkamp, but within the margin of error.

Two more House Democrats are retiring

After two more retirements on Tuesday, the number of House Democrats not seeking re-election in 2022 has hit 28 ahead of this year's midterms. 

Eleven-term Rep. Jim Langevin, D-R.I., and five-term Rep. Jerry McNerney, D-Calif., announced their plans to retire on Tuesday. 

In a video shared on Twitter, Langevin said retiring will "allow me to be closer to home." He said he will "always be most proud" of his vote for the Affordable Care Act. Langevin also published an op-ed in The Providence Journal explaining his decision. 

McNerney said in a statement he "will keep working for the people of my district throughout the remainder of my term and look forward to new opportunities to continue to serve." 

Twenty House Democrats are retiring at the end of the year, while eight are running for a different office. By comparison, six Republicans are retiring and seven are running for a different office. 

Alex Lasry, Democratic Senate candidate in Wisconsin, launches major TV ad buy

Democratic Senate candidate and billionaire Milwaukee Bucks executive Alex Lasry is launching a more than $1 million TV ad buy with more to come in digital and mailings, the Lasry campaign said Tuesday.

This is the largest primary spending by a candidate in the Wisconsin Senate primary race of 2022 so far. It’s a testament to Lasry’s willingness to tap his personal fortune to run in what will be one of the most watched Senate races in America. 

The rotation of ads, first provided to NBC News, offer a glimpse into the issues that could shape the race, such as inflation and the supply chain crunch. They are all issues where the president is faltering nationally but Lasry promises to address back home — and argues he already has. 

“Here’s an idea. If we build things here in America, we won’t have supply chain issues anymore. That’s exactly how we built the Bucks arena,” Lasry says of the Bucks, which claimed the 2021 NBA title.  

But Lasry also ties GOP incumbent Sen. Ron Johnson to former President Donald Trump on the issue of voting rights and his campaign says that obstructionist Republicans are squarely to blame for the state of the economy.  

Wisconsin Lt. Governor Mandela Barnes is leading the Democratic primary in early polling and has already garnered high-profile endorsements including from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and the powerful Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C.

GOP primary ads flood Pennsylvania airwaves

A trio of wealthy candidates have launched new TV ads in recent days as they compete in Pennsylvania's GOP Senate primary.

Celebrity doctor Mehmet Oz, former hedge fund executive David McCormick and former ambassador Carla Sands have spent a combined $7 million so far on ads, according to AdImpact data.They’ve already booked another $2.8 million in future ads, with more likely on the way.

McCormick, who announced his campaign Thursday morning, has two new spots — one declaring he’s running and another featuring two of his high school buddies to head off attacks on his residency. Oz and Sands have faced similar criticisms over their recent returns to Pennsylvania to run for the state’s open Senate seat. 

One of Oz’s latest ads shows the candidate describing himself as a “conservative outsider” who “can’t be bought.” Sands is also up on the airwaves with an ad focused on illegal immigration.

And American Leadership Action, a super PAC supporting Oz, launched a new TV ad knocking McCormick’s work on Wall Street.

The Senate primary features more Republican hopefuls, including Philadelphia attorney George Bochetto, who also jumped into the race this week; conservative commentator Kathy Barnette; and real estate developer Jeff Bartos, who ran unsuccessfully for lieutenant governor in 2018.

The race to replace retiring Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., is expected to be one of the most expensive and competitive Senate contests this year. President Joe Biden won the Keystone State by just 1 percentage point in 2020 and former President Donald Trump won the state by the same margin in 2016.

Multiple candidates are also competing for the Democratic nomination, including Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, Rep. Conor Lamb, state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta and Val Arkoosh, who chairs the Montgomery County Board of Commissioners.

Ben Kamisar contributed to this report.

GOP Senate candidate in Ohio makes $10.5 million personal investment in campaign

Ohio’s Republican Senate primary — already one of the most expensive races in the nation — is seeing another multimillion-dollar investment from a self-funding candidate.

Matt Dolan, who unlike his GOP rivals is keeping a distance from former President Donald Trump, said Wednesday in an interview with NBC News that he recently contributed $8 million and loaned another $2.5 million to his campaign.

“I know I'm the best candidate, and I know I would serve Ohio the best of anyone running,” said Dolan, a state senator and lawyer whose family owns the Cleveland Guardians baseball team. “So the personal investment shows my commitment to win the race, to raise and spend the money that's needed to win a race.”

Candidates can give or loan themselves unlimited amounts, and other candidates are also dumping millions into their own bids. Investment banker Mike Gibbons has put up more than $11 million and former state party chair Jane Timken has sunk $2 million of her own into her campaign. Through September, former car dealer Bernie Moreno had dropped $3 million of his fortune into his bid. 

Also in the race are Josh Mandel, a former state treasurer who leads in polls, and “Hillbilly Elegy” author JD Vance.

Dolan’s $10.5 million investment is unique, given that such a small fraction of it is a personal loan that he can repay later with campaign funds. Dolan’s message is unique in today's Republican Party, too. 

He is betting that his traditional conservative GOP persona — a pro-business pragmatist more stylistically in sync with Sen. Rob Portman, the retiring Ohio Republican he is running to succeed — will stand out in a field of candidates jockeying for support from Trump and his allies.

Dolan is the only GOP candidate in Ohio who voiced support for the infrastructure package that Portman helped pass and that Trump publicly belittled. And he is the only Republican in the race who is not aggressively seeking Trump’s endorsement, although he has said he would vote for Trump if he’s the GOP nominee for president in 2024This month, on the anniversary of the pro-Trump insurrection at the Capitol, Dolan chastised his rivals for catering to the former president’s debunked claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him.

In a statement last September on the day Dolan announced his candidacy, Trump dismissed him as a “RINO” (Republican In Name Only) and cried “cancel culture” on his family’s decision to change the name of their Major League Baseball team from Indians to Guardians.

Dolan said Wednesday that “Donald Trump is a big part of the Republican Party.” He added that conversations he’s had with GOP voters have convinced him that there’s a path for someone like him who is advancing core Republican ideas, not personality-driven politics.

“I think people are starving for transparency, authenticity, experience and a positive record that they can look to and say, ‘Finally, we're going to get things done,’” Dolan said.

Polling — most of it by campaigns or outside spending groups — has shown Dolan at the bottom of the GOP pack, in single digits. But television ads have helped other candidates gain traction. Dolan, who has yet to air ads, has so far reserved more than $4 million in TV and radio time through spring.

Gibbons, according to the ad-tracking firm AdImpact, has already spent $3.6 million on ads, followed by Moreno at $2.5 million, the pro-Mandel Club for Growth Action at $1.9 million and Timken at $1.7 million. A pro-Vance super PAC bankrolled by Peter Thiel, has spent about $1.3 million — a fraction of the $10 million Thiel has committed.

Dolan received another boost this week with the formation of a finance committee that includes several civic and business leaders in Ohio, including Alex Fischer, the former head of the Columbus Partnership once mentioned as a possible Senate candidate. Two others, Cincinnati attorney George Vincent and Akron McDonald’s franchisee John Blickle, previously donated to Timken.

“Matt Dolan’s relentless focus on job creation, economic development and investing in our state is impressive and exactly what Ohio needs in the U.S. Senate,” Blickle, who gave $2,900 to Timken’s campaign last March, said in a statement provided by Dolan’s team. “I have been impressed by the substantive nature of his campaign and his experienced, solutions-oriented approach to getting results. I’m proud to be a member of Team Dolan.”

Club for Growth Action launches ad attacking Timken in Ohio GOP Senate primary

Club for Growth Action, a conservative super PAC that has endorsed former Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel in the state's Republican Senate primary, is uncorking another attack on one of Mandel’s rivals — this time Jane Timken — in an ad debuting Wednesday.

The 30-second commercial focuses on Timken’s past support for Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, R-Ohio, who voted last year to impeach then-President Donald Trump for inciting the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Timken was previously the state Republican Party chair.

“Jane Timken knows she wants your vote,” the narrator begins. “But Timken claimed she didn’t know how she would have voted on Trump’s impeachment while passionately defending her RINO congressman after he voted to impeach Trump.”

The ad is backed by $750,000 in TV and digital spending through Feb. 9, with emphasis on Fox News in the state’s largest markets, the Club told NBC. The spot is also slated to run this weekend in Cincinnati during the Cincinnati Bengals’ NFL playoff game against the Las Vegas Raiders.

This is the second time Club for Growth has gone after a Mandel rival. Last October, the organization launched a campaign against “Hillbilly Elegy” author and venture capitalist JD Vance by highlighting his past criticism of Trump. (Vance is now running as a pro-Trump populist.) New polling released this week by Club for Growth found Mandel leading the crowded GOP primary field with 26 percent, followed by Timken at 15 percent and investment banker Mike Gibbons at 14 percent. Vance, who had been second to Mandel in an earlier Club for Growth poll, was fourth, at 10 percent. The poll has a 4.4 percent margin of error.

“Following Club for Growth’s advertising campaign, Ohio voters didn’t like what they saw in JD Vance and he’s now in fourth,” said Joe Kildea, Club for Growth’s vice president of communications. “Now, Timken is trying to convince voters that she’s the conservative in the race, but her past is going to catch up to her.”

The anti-Timken ad refers back to a well-circulated, late January 2021 interview that Timken gave to The Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com. Timken, who at the time still chaired the Ohio Republican Party and was not yet a Senate candidate, noted that she lives in Gonzalez’s district before praising his overall service in Congress.

“I don’t know if I would have voted the way he did” on impeachment, Timken told the news organization then. “I think he’s spending some time explaining to folks his vote, and I think he’s got a rational reason why he voted that way. I think he’s an effective legislator, and he’s a very good person.”

Timken flip-flopped weeks later after entering the Senate race, calling on Gonzalez to resign. (Gonzalez has resisted such calls but is not seeking re-election this year.)

The Club for Growth ad also highlights political contributions that the Timken Co. — the Ohio manufacturer where her husband and other in-laws have served as top executives and directors — has made to Democrats over the years. Rep. Tim Ryan, the front-runner for the Democratic Senate nomination in Ohio, is among those who’ve received donations, but the company gives far more to Republicans.

In response to the ad, Timken spokesperson Mandi Merritt noted how Club for Growth's polling has shown Mandel's support slipping over time as candidates like Timken rise.

"Mandel is bleeding support because Ohio voters know he is a phony who cheated Republicans out of a Senate seat by quitting politics and abandoning the America First movement when President Trump and conservatives needed fighters most," Merritt said, referring to Mandel's decision to drop out of a 2018 race for Senate. "While Jane Timken was building Ohio into a conservative stronghold, advancing the America First agenda, fighting the Democrats’ sham impeachments and delivering Ohio for President Trump, Josh Mandel was nowhere to be found."

South Florida voters poised to fill vacant seat in Congress in Democratic-leaning special election

Voters are voting in South Florida on Tuesday in Florida's 20th Congressional District, looking to fill a seat that's been vacant since the late Democratic Rep. Alcee Hastings died in April. 

Democrat Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick is poised to win the election in a district where registered Democrats outnumbered Republicans by the end of the 2020 election by a margin of almost 5-to-1. She's running against Republican Jason Mariner, as well as one libertarian candidate and three others with no party affiliation. The district is in the Ft. Lauderdale area. 

Cherfilus-McCormick, a CEO of a home health care company, won her primary election by edging out former Broward County Mayor Dale Holness by just five votes.

If the Democrat wins, she'll restore House Democrats' 10-seat advantage in Congress (222-212). 

White House environmental official, former campaign aide David Kieve leaving

The White House is losing a longtime environmental aide to President Joe Biden who served on his presidential campaign.

David Kieve, the public engagement director at the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), will depart next week. Kieve had held similar roles coordinating outreach to environmental and climate change groups during Biden’s 2020 campaign. He’s also married to the White House communications director, Kate Bedingfield.

The White House didn’t say what Kieve planned to do next or who would replace him. Kieve joins a growing list of notable staff departures from the White House and the vice president’s office as the Biden administration’s first year draws to a close.

Another top environmental official, Cecilia Martinez, who oversaw environmental justice at CEQ, stepped down last week.

When asked whether Bedingfield — who also worked on Biden’s campaign and his vice-presidential staff — is staying at the White House, a White House official said only that there were no personnel announcements to make.

CEQ Chair Brenda Mallory credited Kieve with forming an “unprecedented political coalition,” while White House counselor Steve Ricchetti said Kieve had worked “tirelessly” for Biden since the early part of the presidential primary.

“His advocacy and work on climate issues has made him an important ambassador for the president to the climate community, rallying their support behind our ambitious agenda to tackle the climate crisis, the existential threat of our time,” Ricchetti said in a statement. 

Although environmental groups have applauded Biden’s decision to put climate change at the forefront of his agenda, they’ve voiced disappointment over Biden’s inability in his first year to get sweeping legislation through Congress, including climate provisions of his stalled Build Back Better bill. Any prospects for major climate legislation are dimming as the midterm elections approach in November.

“No one has done more to, kind of, keep the climate community kind of engaged and together, which isn't always the easiest task,” National Wildlife Federation President Collin O’Mara said in an interview.

Former 'American Idol' Clay Aiken makes second bid for Congress

Clay Aiken's singing voice made him famous in 2003 when America's votes carried him to the finals of the popular TV show "American Idol." Nearly 20 years later, Aiken says his voice has another purpose, and Monday the North Carolina native is launching a second bid to represent his home state in Congress. "North Carolina is the place where I first discovered that I had a voice and that it was a voice that could be used for more than singing," Aiken says in a video announcing his candidacy.

Unlike in his first political campaign, Aiken, 43, a Democrat, is emphasizing his bid to become the first openly gay member of Congress from the South. In his announcement, he argues that the "loudest voices" in his home state's politics have become "white nationalists" and "homophobes," adding: "It's not just North Carolina. There's a Marjorie [Taylor Greene] in Georgia and a Lauren [Boebert] in Colorado, and these folks are taking up all the oxygen in the room, and I'm going to tell you I am sick of it." Aiken says that has motivated him to step forward again: "As Democrats, we have got to get better about speaking up and using our voices, because those folks ain't quieting down any time soon."

Aiken says his candidacy will be a call for greater civility. "North Carolina deserves representatives in Washington who use their positions to make people's lives better, not to advance polarizing positions that embarrass our state and stand in the way of real progress," he says.

Aiken is competing in the newly created 6th District race to succeed the veteran Democrat David Price, who for more than 30 years has represented the Triangle region, which is home to the area's major universities, Duke University, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Aiken made a point to honor Price's long public service, saying: "He leaves big shoes to fill. I'd be honored to take his place representing the Triangle."

In 2014, Aiken won the Democratic primary for the 2nd Congressional District, but incumbent Republican Renee Elmers easily won re-election in November, with 59 percent of the vote to Aiken's 41 percent.

Aiken is expected to face a wide field of Democratic contenders this year in the newly drawn district, which is considered solidly Democratic. Aiken, a resident of Wake County, is a 10th-generation North Carolinian.  

Before "American Idol" opened doors to a multiplatinum-selling music career, television and Broadway, Aiken taught special education and founded the National Inclusion Project. He has served as a national goodwill ambassador for UNICEF.

Aiken also competed on the fifth season of "The Celebrity Apprentice," hosted by Donald Trump. Aiken was the runner-up to Arsenio Hall.

CORRECTION (Jan. 10, 2022, 8:45 a.m. ET): An earlier version of this article misstated the Congressional District Aiken is running in. It is the 6th District, not the 4th.

Oregon says former NYT columnist Kristof can't run for governor because of residency issues

Oregon's Elections Division has deemed former New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof ineligible to run for governor because he does not meet the state requirement that a candidate has to have lived in the state for three years before an election. 

Kristof launched his campaign as a Democrat last year, joining a crowded field in which he has posted strong fundraising figures. But the decision by the Elections Division means that unless Kristof can win an appeal, he won't be able to continue his bid. 

In a briefing with reporters, Oregon Secretary of State Shemia Fagan ticked through the evidence election officials considered. She said Kristof voted for 20 years in New York, including in November 2020, while he also received mail, filed income taxes and had a driver's license from the state. While Fagan's office gave the Kristof campaign the opportunity to argue that he should be considered eligible to run, she said elections staff members told her "it wasn't even a close call." 

"While I have no doubt that Mr. Kristof's sentiments and feelings to Oregon are genuine and sincere, they are simply dwarfed by the mountains of objective evidence that, until recently, he considered himself a New York resident," Fagan said. 

Kristof tweeted promising to appeal the decision, claiming that "a failing political establishment in Oregon has chosen to protect itself, rather than give voters a choice."

Kristof accused "state officials" of trying to silence his campaign because of his "willingness to challenge the status quo" as he delivered remarks Thursday afternoon promising to challenge the decision in court.

"To join this race, I left a job that I loved because our state cannot survive another generation of leaders turning away from the people they pledge to serve," he said.

"I owe my entire existence to Oregon — this state welcomed by dad as a refugee in 1952 and he put down roots here. Oregon has provided a home to me and my family as these roots deepen. Because I've always known Oregon to be my home, the law says that I am qualified to run for governor. "

Former Wisconsin Rep. Sean Duffy passes on 2022 statewide runs

Former Rep. Sean Duffy, R-Wisc., said in a radio interview Thursday morning that he will not run for governor or Senate in 2022. 

“You have to be able to give 100 percent to a race and right now in my life, with my kids, it’s just not the right time for me to run,” Duffy told WISN’s The Jay Webber Show, noting he has nine children. Duffy resigned from Congress in 2019 when his wife was pregnant with their youngest child, who was expected to be born with health issues. 

“Do I think my public service time is over? I hope it’s not,” Duffy later said, adding that he may reconsider public service when his children are older.

Former President Donald Trump encouraged Duffy to run for governor and said Duffy would have Trump’s endorsement if he decided to run. Duffy also said he is not interested in running for Senate if GOP Sen. Ron Johnson decides not to run for re-election. 

 

 

GOP Senate candidate in Ohio slams primary rivals for embracing stolen election lies

A Republican U.S. Senate hopeful in Ohio is using the anniversary of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot to accuse his rivals of undermining democracy while amplifying or indulging former President Donald Trump’s debunked claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him.

“One year ago, our entire nation, the free world and America’s adversaries, watched the events of Jan. 6 unfold with stunning clarity,” Matt Dolan, a state senator from the Cleveland area, said in a campaign statement late Wednesday. “It was an attack on American democracy, our Constitution and the rule of law that must not be minimized, normalized or explained away.”

Dolan is the lone Republican in Ohio’s closely watched Senate race who is not aggressively seeking Trump’s endorsement. Although his statement did not single out anyone by name, each of his primary rivals to varying degrees has accommodated Trump’s election lies. Tops on the list is the GOP primary’s front-runner, Josh Mandel, whose central campaign message is the debunked claim that the last presidential election was stolen. Another candidate, Bernie Moreno, initially said he accepted the 2020 results but recently flip-flopped in a TV ad in which he explicitly said Trump was “right” to claim the election was stolen from him.