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Obamacare Repeal Attempts Have Failed. Status: Stalled.

As a candidate, Trump vowed to repeal and replace Obamacare with “something better” that would cost less, do more and insure “everybody.” He insisted repeatedly that he’d do it on Day One. Yet, the president entered office without an alternative policy proposal. A year since his election, Obamacare remains the law of the land.

GOP leaders in Congress have tried to repeal and replace it three times, but failed each time at the hands of their own party, which disagrees on what “something better” looks like.

"Our new president, of course, has not been in this line of work before, and, I think, had excessive expectations about how quickly things happen in the democratic process," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said, according to WLWT, an NBC-affiliate station in Cincinnati.

The Republican bills, which Trump supported, all had one thing in common, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office: millions more uninsured than simply leaving the law in place, and often, skyrocketing costs. Should any of these bills been passed and signed by Trump, it would have broken a key element of his promise.

Administratively, Trump has worked to unravel regulations and dismantle the law from the inside out. He’s scrapped subsidies for low-income individuals, cut federal support for enrollment efforts, allowed cheaper plans with fewer benefits to be sold, and personally intervened to halt a stabilization effort in Iowa.

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Obamacare Repeal Attempts Have Failed. Status: Stalled.

As a candidate, Trump vowed to repeal and replace Obamacare with “something better” that would cost less, do more and insure “everybody.” He insisted repeatedly that he’d do it on Day One. Yet, the president entered office without an alternative policy proposal. A year since his election, Obamacare remains the law of the land.

GOP leaders in Congress have tried to repeal and replace it three times, but failed each time at the hands of their own party, which disagrees on what “something better” looks like.

"Our new president, of course, has not been in this line of work before, and, I think, had excessive expectations about how quickly things happen in the democratic process," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said, according to WLWT, an NBC-affiliate station in Cincinnati.

The Republican bills, which Trump supported, all had one thing in common, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office: millions more uninsured than simply leaving the law in place, and often, skyrocketing costs. Should any of these bills been passed and signed by Trump, it would have broken a key element of his promise.

Administratively, Trump has worked to unravel regulations and dismantle the law from the inside out. He’s scrapped subsidies for low-income individuals, cut federal support for enrollment efforts, allowed cheaper plans with fewer benefits to be sold, and personally intervened to halt a stabilization effort in Iowa.