Printer who nixed gay pride shirt goes to Kentucky Supreme Court

Blaine Adamson argued that he shouldn't be compelled to promote messages that go against his religious beliefs.
Blaine Adamson, owner of Hands On Originals in Lexington, Kentucky.
Blaine Adamson, owner of Hands On Originals in Lexington, Kentucky.Alliance Defending Freedom
By Associated Press

FRANKFORT, Ky. — A Kentucky print shop owner who refused to make a gay pride T-shirt argued before the Kentucky Supreme Court that he shouldn't be compelled to promote messages that go against his religious beliefs.

Blaine Adamson is owner of Hands-On Originals in Lexington and declined to print a shirt promoting an LGBT pride festival in 2012. The city's Human Rights Commission said that refusal violated its gay-rights fairness ordinance.

On Friday, the high court heard an attorney for the T-shirt maker argue that the First Amendment protects him from having to print that message. An attorney for the Human Rights Commission says the T-shirt maker cannot pick and choose who it wants to serve in the Lexington community.

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments from attorneys and will issue a ruling at a later date.

Follow NBC Out on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram