Global death toll passes 100K as confirmed cases top 1.6 million

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
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A healthcare worker talks with a patient at a COVID-19 testing site near Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia on March 24, 2020.Matt Slocum / AP

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The coronavirus death toll across the U.S. continues to climb and passed 18,500 by Friday evening, according to an NBC News tally. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in New York state had reached 170,512.

Globally, the number of cases passed 1.6 million with more than 102,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University, as countries deliberate over further lockdown measures or worry about second wave outbreaks. Millions of people around the world are preparing for religious celebrations and a holiday weekend.

Current and former U.S. officials, meanwhile, tell NBC News that American spy agencies collected raw intelligence hinting at a public health crisis in Wuhan, China, in November, but the information was not understood as the first warning signs of an impending global pandemic.

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading Apr. 11 Coronavirus news.

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Fact check: Does recovery give you immunity to coronavirus?

“They have immunity if they’ve had the virus,” Trump said of people who have recovered from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus while discussing the issue of serology tests in development to gauge the true spread of the virus.

The president is exaggerating a bit here. It’s not yet known what kind of immunity recovered patients will have to COVID-19. Some infections result in lifelong immunity (think chicken pox) while other infections will produce short-term immunity in recovered patients. 

Studies into the potential immunity effects of the novel coronavirus are ongoing

Surgeon General Jerome Adams shows his inhaler to highlight asthma, coronavirus risks for minorities

Surgeon General Jerome Adams highlighted the disproportionate asthma risks for black and minority Americans at Friday's White House coronavirus briefing by pulling his own inhaler out of his pocket.

"I've been carrying around an inhaler in my pocket for 40 years, out of fear of having a fatal asthma attack," said Adams, 45, who is African-American. "I hope that showing you this inhaler shows little kids all across country that they can grow up to be surgeon general one day.

"But I more immediately share it so everyone knows it doesn't matter if you look fit, if you look young, you are still at risk for spreading and dying from coronavirus."

Photo: Tiny face shields protect babies in Thailand

A Thai nurse puts face shields on newborn babies as a precaution against the coronavirus pandemic at Princ Hospital Suvarnabhumi in Samut Prakan on Wednesday in Thailand.Rungroj Yongrit / EPA

As coronavirus continues its spread, look through our Week in Pictures to see how it's impacting people around the globe.

Google and Apple will team up to track spread of coronavirus with smartphone tech

Apple and Google announced a partnership Friday to try to use technology to trace the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

The two companies, usually fierce rivals, said they would work together in the coming weeks to build new tools that would enable people and health authorities to track the virus using Bluetooth proximity data from their smartphones.

“We hope to harness the power of technology to help countries around the world slow the spread of COVID-19 and accelerate the return of everyday life,” the two companies said in a rare joint statement.

Read the full story here.

Photos: Staying home, giving thanks

Nathan Congleton / TODAY

At 7 p.m. in New York, neighborhoods across the city share a moment of recognition during a challenging time. Residents open their windows to celebrate the hard work and selfless dedication of first responders at the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. See more pictures of grateful New Yorkers here.

OPINION: Coronavirus in the U.S. is a tale of two pandemics. New CDC numbers prove it.

Every day, we are inundated with information about the horrors of the coronavirus pandemic. We hear about the rising number of deaths, the increasing rate of infections, the mental anguish, the shortages of critical supplies in hospitals, the people struggling to pay bills and survive, the long lines at food banks and so much more. But lost in the coverage of this virus is one critical point that we simply cannot ignore: the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans and disenfranchised communities.

To be clear, I am not saying the pandemic is a conspiracy to kill or target Blacks, but it is illuminating the existing racial disparities in this country that reverberate in everything from health care to jobs, housing and more. We are watching a crisis within a crisis unfold before us, and our challenge is not just to expose it but also to ensure that when we rebuild and re-emerge, we take strategic steps to rectify it.

Read the full THINK piece here.

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NYC's 911 calls drop, approach normal volume

Medical calls to New York City’s 911 system have started to wane although they remain higher than average, according to a fire department spokesperson.

In total, 4,584 medial calls were logged by the FDNY EMS system on Thursday, which is higher than the normal 4,000 medical calls but at last week's peak that number was at more than 6,500.

As NBC News first reported earlier this week, Emergency Medical Services, the part of the fire department that runs the city's paramedic response, has been responding to three or four times its average daily number of cardiac calls, with  each call almost twice as likely to involve a death.

The global death toll crosses 100K, according to Johns Hopkins

The global death toll from COVID-19 has crossed 100,000, according to a tally compiled by Johns Hopkins University. 100,376 people had died as of Friday afternoon ET.