U.S. passes 1 million cases

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More than 1 million people in the United States have been infected by the coronavirus as of Tuesday, a mark that comes as some states begin to ease lockdowns.

The U.S. has recorded more than 56,000 deaths due to COVID-19, according to NBC News' tally. Worldwide, over 3 million people have been sickened and more than 212,000 have died.

Some parts of the U.S. have shown indications of a leveling off of new cases and deaths. That has, in turn, sparked greater calls — particularly from supporters of the Trump administration — to push for governors to begin reopening stores and public spaces.

But health professionals warn that coronavirus cases could easily spike again if proper social distancing is not maintained.

President Donald Trump said Monday that the effort to expand testing is being done with the private sector to "help local governments get this horrible plague over with and over with fast."

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading April 29 coronavirus news.

Fauci praises Brad Pitt's 'SNL' impersonation: 'He did a great job'

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, offered an exceptionally positive diagnosis Tuesday for actor Brad Pitt’s imitation of him on "Saturday Night Live" this weekend.

“I think he did a great job,” Fauci said.

“He got the raspiness of my voice right. … He got the hand gestures right,” the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said during a live-streamed interview Tuesday with The Economic Club of Washington, D.C.

Fauci suggested, however, that Pitt could perhaps improve upon one element of his imitation.

Read the full story here.

Goya donates 300,000 pounds of food, 20,000 protective masks

Goya Foods has donated more than 300,000 pounds of food and 20,000 masks in recent weeks, and plans to continue donating additional food and gear weekly, the company said Tuesday.

Food donations have been made to food banks and organizations in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Florida, Texas, and Illinois.

“As an essential business, our Goya teams are working 24/7 to meet the overwhelming demand for food and ensure that supermarket shelves nationwide are stocked with nourishing products, while also providing food to communities who are food insecure or not able to get to supermarkets,” Bob Unanue, President of Goya Foods, said in a news release.

Goya Foods, headquartered in Jersey City, N.J., is the country’s largest Hispanic-owned food company.

Putin extends Russia's stay-at-home regime to May 12

In a national address Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced an extension of a nationwide self-isolation order until May 12.

“The peak has not yet passed,” Putin said. "The stricter we follow the quarantine rules, the faster it will pass."

Putin also ordered officials to draw up plans for a phased return to normal life after May 12 if the situation improves by then.

He said that the measures cannot be lifted immediately, and that “there is a long and difficult road ahead." 

Russia reported a record in new cases on Tuesday, with 6,411 new cases confirmed — bringing the total to 93,558 cases.

Photo: Birthday wishes for U.K. centenarian

Mandy Alison reads one of over 125,000 cards sent to Captain Tom Moore for his upcoming 100th birthday in the Great Hall of Bedford School, north of London, on Tuesday. Moore captured the hearts of the U.K. after initially setting out to raise less than $2,000 for Britain's National Health Service by walking 100 laps in his 82-foot garden, but went on to break the record for raising the most money in an individual charity walk -- more than $33 million. Moore turns 100 on Thursday. Justin Tallis / AFP - Getty Images

'Pathetic': Schumer slams Trump's coronavirus testing blueprint

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., on Tuesday slammed President Donald Trump’s new blueprint to ramp up coronavirus testing, saying that it lacked details about how states should implement the plan.

“You know the report they issued yesterday? It was pathetic. It didn't have any details. And then at the end, it said let the states do it,” Schumer said in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

Schumer said that he plans to send a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to push for oversight hearings when the Senate reconvenes at the Capitol next week in which committees could call members of the White House coronavirus task force and Trump administration as witnesses.

“No one in the administration has given an answer specifically as to how the states should do it and that's one of the reasons I think we need to get the hearings,” Schumer said Tuesday.

Read the full story here.

'Fogging' technology could help battle coronavirus

A machine invented a dozen years ago may make it possible to kill the coronavirus in shared spaces.

The HaloFogger, which has been used against SARS and Ebola, has been approved by the EPA for emergency use against COVID-19.

It sprays a dry hydrogen peroxide mist that can clean rooms without damaging electronics. Each machine costs $10,000, and the amount of mist needed to clean a room costs $10.

Tom Trojansky, whose ambulances serve a portion of suburban Philadelphia, has been using a HaloFogger to clean his fleet of emergency vehicles. He has more than 100 employees, responding to dozens of COVID-19 calls per day, but says only one employee has contracted the disease.

NYC mayor announces 'one big city-wide virtual graduation ceremony' for seniors

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday said the city would throw "one big city-wide virtual graduation ceremony" for seniors who won't be able to walk and receive their diplomas in person this year. 

De Blasio said he realizes graduating seniors are being robbed of a very "human moment," but that "we need to celebrate you." Individual schools can decide how to handle graduation ceremonies on their own, and the city-wide event will be additional. 

"We're going to make it something very special," de Blasio said. "We’re going to give you something you will remember for the rest of your life."

He said the ceremony will include "very special guests," some of whom are from the "extraordinary roster of people" who graduated from the New York City public school system.

JetBlue becomes first U.S. airline to require passengers to wear masks

JetBlue Airways on Monday became the first U.S. airline to announce that all passengers will have to wear a face covering on flights.

Starting May 4, passengers will be required to wear a mask that covers their nose and mouth during the duration of each flight and also during check-in, boarding and deplaning, according to a JetBlue statement. Small children who can't keep a mask on are exempt.

The airline has already started requiring flight crew members to wear face coverings on the job. American Airlines will begin requiring flight attendants to wear masks starting May 1, the airline said in a statement Monday. Passengers will be offered personal protective equipment. Masks became mandatory for United Airlines flight attendants on Friday.

On Thursday, the Association of Flight Attendants, which represents 50,000 flight attendants across 20 airlines, sent a letter to U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar asking that the departments use their "authority to mandate masks in aviation for crew, employees and passengers; require personal protective equipment; and end all leisure travel until the virus is contained."

Navy Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds to honor frontline workers

The Air Force Thunderbirds and the Navy Blue Angels will give a loud salute Tuesday afternoon to healthcare workers and others on the frontline in the fight against the coronavirus with flyovers in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

The event will begin at noon in Newark, New Jersey and New York City and will last about 35 minutes, the Thunderbirds said in a press release. The aircraft will then head to Trenton, New Jersey, for a 10-minute show that begins at 1:45 p.m.

The final stop will be in Philadelphia at 2 p.m. and will last for about 20 minutes.

Read the full story here.