Stay-at-home protests held across the country

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Image: Protest To Reopen California Businesses, Beaches, And Parks Held In Huntington Beach
Protestors gather in a demonstration in Huntington Beach, California on May 1, 2020.Apu Gomes / Getty Images

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Protests against stay-at-home orders were held across the country Friday amid mounting frustration over the economic impact from the coronavirus pandemic.

Rallies were scheduled in at least 10 states. Outside the Capitol building in Albany, New York, protesters chanted "USA! USA!" as they flew American and "Don't Tread on Me" flags. Counterprotesters scheduled their own rallies in support of keeping non-essential businesses closed.

Some states started to slowly reopen Friday, including Texas, where retail stores, restaurants, movie theaters and malls were allowed to open for business. In Louisiana, restaurants (except those in hard-hit New Orleans) are allowed to add outdoor tables.

The calls to reopen business come as meat processing plants struggle with widespread outbreaks that have slowed or halted production. At a Tyson Foods pork-processing plant in Indiana, nearly 900 employees, 40 percent of the workforce, tested positive for the coronavirus.

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading May 2 coronavirus news.

Remdesivir maker 'moving very quickly' with FDA on possible coronavirus use, CEO says

The company that makes remdesivir, an experimental drug for treatment of the coronavirus, is moving very quickly with the FDA on possible emergency authorization to get the drug to patients, the CEO said.

"I expect that they're going to act very quickly," Gilead Sciences CEO Daniel O'Day said of the FDA, "and we’re prepared as a company to make sure we get this medicine to as many patients as possible, as soon as possible after that approval."

Gilead is also working to expand its capacity for producing remdesivir, O'Day said. The company thinks it could make millions of treatment courses available by the end of the year.

O'Day noted that remdesivir currently is for "severe" coronavirus patients who are hospitalized, but he said the company's scientists are exploring if the medication could work to treat patients who are in earlier stages of the illness.

Read the full story here.

Three-year-old girl shows off sheep in online agricultural show

With livestock shows around Britain canceled due to COVID-19, farmers are finding innovative ways to still present their prized livestock. A video of 3-year-old Barley Brook Sellar presenting Ethel, her prized Border Leicester sheep, has been watched more than a million times on Twitter.  

Filmed at the family's farm in Norfolk, England, the video shows Barley introducing Ethel, walking her in a short circle and commanding her to stand. It was shared on Twitter by one of the judges for the Young Handlers Under 8 Years Old category. 

"What kind of sheep is this?" Barley's mother, Caitlin Jenkins, can be heard asking. "A white one," replies Barley. The Greatest Online Agricultural Show, which is donating money raised to British farming charities, opens Saturday. 

Target, Walmart workers and others plan 'sickout' protests over coronavirus safety

A Target worker in Virginia wearing his own mask, gloves and safety glasses said he felt helpless recently when customers swarmed him as he organized a clearance area. Another Target worker, a cashier in North Carolina, said he welcomed the installation of plexiglass partitions at the registers over a week ago, but said they should have come sooner. A Whole Foods worker in Portland said she and some of her colleagues are feeling "scared, angry and devastated" after a fellow employee died from the coronavirus last week.

To convey their concerns, they plan to call out of work Friday as part of a nationwide employee "sickout" involving Target and Whole Foods, as well as AmazonInstacartFedEx and Walmart.

The grassroots effort — the latest example of a wave of worker activism during the coronavirus crisis — is asking customers to boycott those companies' local stores and services Friday to coincide with International Workers' Day, also known as May Day, which in a normal year is marked by massive labor rights demonstrations in major cities.

Read the full story here.

Some minority groups in UK have higher death rate than white Britons, study finds

Per-capita hospital deaths are the highest among the black Caribbean population in England and Wales, who are dying at triple the rate of white Britons, a new study found on Friday. Other minority groups — including Pakistanis and black Africans — have seen similar numbers.

The impacts of the COVID-19 crisis are not uniform across ethnic groups, and show clear disparities in their mortality rates, the Institute for Fiscal Studies said in the report. Merely aggregating all minorities together when examining data misses important differences, it said. As of Friday, more than 26,000 people across Britain have died from coronavirus.

The British research institute suggested that occupational exposure partially explains disproportionate deaths for some groups. More than two in 10 black African women of working age, for example, are employed in health and social care roles. Indian men are 150 percent more likely to work in health or social care roles than their white British counterparts. While the Indian ethnic group makes up 3 percent of the working-age population of England and Wales, they account for 14 percent of doctors.

Tokyo aquarium asks public to FaceTime shy eels under lockdown

Spotted garden eels, similar to those held at a Tokyo aquarium, burrow in sand at signs of perceived threats.Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild / Getty Images file

A Japanese aquarium is calling on members of the public to play a virtual game of peek-a-boo with its community of about 300 eels to help prevent the creatures from getting shy under lockdown.

Spotted garden eels at the Sumida Aquarium in Tokyo are accustomed to streams of people looking into their tanks, but officials said in a statement Friday that appears to be changing since the facility closed its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic on March 1.

This variety of eels are typically very cautious of their surroundings in the wild and bury themselves in the sand of the ocean floor at the sign of any threat. Aquarium officials are concerned the captive eels are reverting back to this behavior.

Read the full story here.

Rock band Queen releases 'You Are The Champions' in nod to health workers

The rock band Queen and singer Adam Lambert released a new version of the iconic song “We Are The Champions” on Thursday evening, re-naming the song “You Are The Champions” in a tribute to healthcare workers around the world.

The song was recorded on mobile phones and all funds and proceeds "will go to supporting frontline workers through the World Health Organization's efforts in the global fight against COVID-19," the band's official page said. The effort has raised more than $4.5 million as of Friday.

The Week in Pictures: Lockdowns ease and a Blue Angels flyover

Inmates wearing face masks are lined up during a security sweep at the Izalco prison in San Salvador, El Salvador, on April 25. Authorities crammed the prisoners tightly together in prison yards while searching their cells. President Nayib Bukele ordered the crackdown after more than 20 people were murdered in the country a day earlier and intelligence suggested the orders came from imprisoned gang leaders.El Salvador Presidency Press Office / AP

As states around the U.S. and some countries in Europe take steps toward reopening, look through our Week in Pictures. 

Ferrari set to restart as 4.5 million people head back to work in Italy on Monday

The Italian luxury carmaker Ferrari said on Thursday it would restart operations in Northern Italy on Monday, when the country is set to begin lifting lockdown measures. The sites will resume operations “gradually” and return to full production on May 8, the company said in a statement. 

This comes as 4.5 million people across Italy are expected to return to work on Monday, according to the Italian workplace insurance agency INAIL. Commuting may have a strong impact on the epidemic’s curve, as 15 percent of workers use public transport, the agency said. 

Italy — one of the hardest-hit countries by the pandemic — has the highest reported deaths and the second most reported cases in Europe. The country has more than 200,000 confirmed cases as of Friday, although due to a  decrease in the rate of infections, social restrictions are slowly loosening.