House passes' $3T 'HEROES' aid for stimulus checks, rent assistance

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
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Truckers protest low rates and lack of broker transparency along Constitution Avenue in Washington on May 15, 2020.Olivier Douliery / AFP - Getty Images

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The global coronavirus death toll passed 300,000, with more than 4.4 million confirmed cases around the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The U.S. remains the world's worst-hit country, with more than 86,600 deaths.

Friday evening the House passed a $3 trillion coronavirus relief package that would include another round of stimulus payments of up to $1,200 per person. President Donald Trump has suggested he won't support the bill.

Critics Friday said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is presenting families detained at the border with the choice of allowing children to be released without them or staying together and facing possible virus exposure in detention.

Additionally, the CDC issued a health alert to physicians on a rare but potentially deadly condition linked to COVID-19 in children that has now been reported in at least 19 states and Washington, D.C.

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading May 16 coronavirus news.

U.S. pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

SINGAPORE — An American cargo pilot who admitted to “poor judgment” in breaking a quarantine order to buy medical supplies became the first foreigner imprisoned in Singapore for breaching its restrictions meant to curb the coronavirus, his lawyer said Friday.

FedEx pilot Brian Dugan Yeargan, 44, of Alaska, was sentenced to four weeks Wednesday after he pleaded guilty to leaving his hotel room for three hours to buy masks and a thermometer, defense lawyer Ronnie Tan said.

Singapore has one of the largest outbreaks in Asia, with 26,000 cases. More than 90% of those infected are foreign workers living in crowded dormitories, while the government recently began easing restrictions for the local population.

The tiny city-state has strict penalties for those who breach quarantine rules, don’t wear masks in public or fail to adhere to social distancing measures. Quarantine violators face up to six months in jail, a fine of up to 10,000 Singapore dollars ($7,000) or both.

NFL's first phase reopening set to begin

NFL facilities can begin reopening Tuesday in cities and states that will allow it, league commissioner Roger Goodell said in a letter Friday to team executives.

"This first phase of reopening is an important step in demonstrating our ability to operate safety and effectively, even in the current environment," the letter states.

The reopening would generally prohibit coaches and players from being at the facilities, and on-site retail and ticket sales aren't yet allowed, Goodell said. Workers must undergo infection control training, and team facilities can only operate at 50 percent capacity, with a maximum of 75 people, the commissioner said.

The season was scheduled to begin Sept. 10, but that date was unclear as a result of the pandemic. On Tuesday Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey said major pro sports franchises could revive games in his state beginning Saturday.

CDC's Redfield tweets models showing over 100,000 deaths by June 1

Mother gives birth outside hospital, father uses face mask to tie umbilical cord

Sarah Rose and David Patrick knew they would be required to wear masks at the hospital during the delivery of their son, but they never imagined that they would use one to bind his umbilical cord.

They also never pictured being out in the cold when they welcomed their son. Yet that was their reality over Mother's Day weekend.

Read the full story.

Aid for undocumented immigrants in California starts Monday

Starting Monday, undocumented immigrants living in California who are ineligible for federal financial aid amid the coronavirus pandemic can apply to a new program.

Eligible immigrant families will be able to get up to $1,000 per household under Gov. Gavin Newsom’s coronavirus emergency assistance plan, which was announced last month.

Newsom announced a $125 million public-private Disaster Relief Fund for California workers who do not have permanent legal status and are excluded from receiving government assistance such as unemployment benefits and federal stimulus checks during the coronavirus pandemic.

Read the full story.

The Week in Pictures: Fake diners and a haircut in the park

See more photos as countries around the world try to determine how to safely reopen. 

Researchers in France identify virus-like symptoms from fall

PARIS — In a potential breakthrough, doctors are finding evidence that the coronavirus may have been in France much earlier than anyone thought.

A team of researchers in the city of Colmar in northeastern France announced last week that it had identified two X-rays, from Nov. 16 and Nov. 18, showing symptoms consistent with the virus.

It could be evidence the virus was spreading in Europe two months before previously known and even before it had been officially identified in China.

The news comes a week after a separate team of scientists in Paris established that a patient had the coronavirus Dec. 27, so far the earliest known case in Europe.

Read the whole story.

Judge denies R. Kelly's request for release

A federal judge Friday denied singer R. Kelly's request to be released from jail because of concerns about contracting the coronavirus. He is being held at Chicago's Metropolitan Correctional Center while he awaits trial on charges connected to alleged child sexual abuse.

Judge Ann M. Donnelly of the Eastern District of New York said the pop star's prediabetic condition was common, shared by about one in three Americans, and did not qualify him as especially susceptible to contracting coronavirus behind bars.

It's the third time Kelly has been denied release based on unfounded claims he's likely to to suffer greater harm if he catches the virus. The singer's defense claimed he is "likely diabetic," but Donnelly disagreed, suggesting Kelly, 53, is relatively young and well cared for.

Kelly, who is being held without bond, faces charges in Chicago and New York that include sexual exploitation of children, possession of child pornography and racketeering. He has said he is innocent; last year he pleaded not guilty in Chicago.

Sailors on sidelined USS Theodore Roosevelt get virus for second time

WASHINGTON — Five sailors on the U.S. aircraft carrier sidelined in Guam due to a COVID-19 outbreak have tested positive for the virus for the second time and have been taken off the ship, according to the Navy.

The resurgence of the virus in the five sailors on the USS Theodore Roosevelt underscores the befuddling behavior of the highly contagious virus and raises questions about how troops that test positive can be reintegrated into the military, particularly on ships.

All five sailors had previously tested positive and had gone through at least two weeks of isolation. As part of the process, they all had to test negative twice in a row, with the tests separated by at least a day or two before they were allowed to go back to the ship.

The Roosevelt has been at port in Guam since late March after the outbreak of the virus was discovered. More than 4,000 of the 4,800 crew members have gone ashore since then for quarantine or isolation. Earlier this month hundreds of sailors began returning to the ship, in coordinated waves, to get ready to set sail again.

Click here for the full story. 

NYPD to no longer enforce wearing masks absent 'serious danger'

New York City police will no longer enforce mask-wearing by the public unless there is "serious danger," Mayor Bill De Blasio announced at a Friday news conference.

The decision comes after criticism of the NYPD this week over a video showing officers handcuffing and pinning down a 22-year old mother who was not wearing a mask properly.

The police department has also come under scrutiny over its enforcement of social-distancing policies resulting in a disproportionate number of summonses of people of color.

Read the full report here.