House passes $3T 'HEROES' aid package as U.S. death toll nears 90,000

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
Image: Food Bank Distributes To Those In Need At The Barclays Center In Brooklyn
People wait on a long line to receive a food bank donation at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York on May 15, 2020.Stephanie Keith / Getty Images

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As the number of deaths neared 90,000 in the U.S., the House passed a $3 trillion coronavirus relief package that would include another round of stimulus payments of up to $1,200 per person. President Donald Trump has suggested he won't support the bill.

Similar to the first major coronavirus aid package signed into law in late March, the 1,815-page HEROES Act passed by a vote of 208-199 and now heads to the Senate. One Republican backed the bill, while 14 Democrats voted against it.

It came as the global coronavirus death toll passed 300,000, with more than 4.4 million confirmed cases around the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. The U.S. remains the world's worst-hit country, with more than 86,600 deaths.

Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a health alert to physicians on a rare but potentially deadly condition linked to COVID-19 in children that has now been reported in at least 19 states and Washington, D.C.

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

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Pelosi 'thrilled' over passage of $3 trillion aid package

It’s a work from home Congress as House approves proxy vote

WASHINGTON  — It all started with the grandchildren.

As House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer saw it, if he could Face Time with the grandkids, why not have Congress legislate by video chat and avoid the health risks of convening at the Capitol during the coronavirus pandemic?

And so the silver-haired, 80-year-old congressman from Maryland helped steer the House into one of the more substantial rules changes of its 230-year history.

“This is no revolutionary, radical change,” Hoyer said. “This is exactly what the Founders wanted to happen.”

The House approved the new rules Friday, during what could likely be the chamber’s last fully in-person votes for the foreseeable future.

From now on, lawmakers will be allowed to cast House floor votes by proxy — without being “present” as the Constitution requires. The next step will allow them to skip the middle-man and simply vote remotely once leaders approve the technology.

Washington governor backs off requirement for restaurant logs

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday sought to clarify a rule that would require restaurants to keep daily logs of all customers once they reopen, saying it's now voluntary.

"We are asking visitors to voluntarily provide contact information in case of COVID-19 exposure," Inslee said in a statement, adding that the information would be shared with health officials if a visitor is exposed to the virus. If unused, the log would be destroyed in 30 days. 

"This will not be required of anyone," Inslee said.

On Monday, Inslee issued guidance that said restaurants allowed to reopen with  table service were required to "create a daily log of all customers" in case contact tracing was needed later.

The data collection requirement caused an uproar, and several restaurant owners were skeptical of the rule, The Seattle Times reported.

Businesses are still required to keep a log of those who voluntarily give their information.