Trump says he takes hydroxychloroquine as U.S. death toll tops 90,000

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
Image: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Rome
A woman wearing a face shield drinks coffee at a cafe as Italy eases some of its lockdown measures in Rome on May 18, 2020.Yara Nardi / Reuters

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President Donald Trump on Monday said he has been taking hydroxychloroquine, an unproven treatment for COVID-19 that he has vigorously promoted. The FDA has warned the drug can cause serious heart problems.

The U.S. coronavirus death toll has topped 90,800, according to NBC News' count. More than 1.5 million cases have been confirmed in the country.Globally, more than 318,000 have died from the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The number of deaths in the U.S. is expected to hit 100,000 by June 1, according to Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Monday, China pledged an extra $2 billion to deal with the coronavirus crisis at the World Health Assembly, which was held virtually. U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar said that the World Health Organization's "failure cost many lives and it must not happen again."

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

This live coverage has ended. Continue to May 19 coronavirus news.

Camps won't look 'typical this summer,' directors say as they release new safety guidelines

As thousands of camps across the country weigh whether to open this summer, the YMCA and the American Camp Association have released best practices to keep children safe during the coronavirus pandemic.

The detailed guidelines include precautions such as having children wear masks when appropriate, engaging in smaller group activities than usual and regularly sanitizing sports equipment — if they decide to operate.

Read more here.

Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine shows positive results, moves to larger studies

A COVID-19 vaccine candidate has shown it can prompt an immune response in the human body, and was also found to be safe and well-tolerated in a small group of patients.

Moderna, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company that manufactured the vaccine, announced the encouraging early results from its phase 1 clinical trial Monday morning. The drug is now being tested in larger studies.

The company reported that eight patients who received two doses of the vaccine developed neutralizing antibodies — which are believed to be key in providing protection from the virus — at levels seen in patients who've recovered from COVID-19.

Read more here.

Fearing Trump's green card policy, families with immigrants may opt out of coronavirus care

Immigrants participate in a naturalization ceremony to become new U.S. citizens in Los Angeles on March 20, 2018.Lucy Nicholson / Reuters file

Families who have at least one member without a green card are fearful of using public benefit programs because of a Trump immigration policy, creating concern on whether they will also avoid publicly available coronavirus testing and treatment.

The Urban Institute study found persistence of the chilling effect caused by the Trump administration’s public charge rule that expands the criteria for denying legal permanent residence applications based on past or potential use of government benefit programs.

Read more here.

Many Americans are unaware of the coronavirus-related financial assistance that's available to them

Many unemployed people may not be aware of the coronavirus-related financial assistance that is available to them.

A whopping 80 percent of unemployed Americans say they haven’t reached out for relief measures, according to Credit Karma.

They think they don’t qualify. They’re overwhelmed by all the information. They don’t even know where to start.

These are the top reasons for not accessing assistance, according to the financial advice website, which surveyed 1,037 U.S. adults in April about their understanding of government relief measures related to COVID-19.

The stimulus checks are the top story, but you may be able to access other types of relief.

Here’s what else you may qualify for.

From touchless payments to 'quarantined' returns, the retail experience may be forever changed

Eager shoppers will soon be able to browse their local retail stores as states continue to roll back stay-at-home orders. But instead of testing a swatch of lipsticks at a makeup counter or waiting in line to try on summer shorts, customers should expect “virtual try-on tools,” styling via app, shuttered fitting rooms, and returns that are quarantined for 72 hours.

With no vaccine for the coronavirus on the market, the role of the retail store has abruptly pivoted from a high-touch experience to safety and practicality as states begin to reopen nonessential businesses.

Aside from new sanitation practices, stores such as Gap are temporarily closing restrooms and quarantining returns for 24 hours before putting them back on the sales floor​. Nordstrom is keeping tried and returned merchandise off the sales floor for 72 hours. Gap and Kohl’s are also temporarily closing fitting rooms.

Several retailers have adopted Kroger's strategy of adding space between merchandise in their stores and designating certain shopping hours for high-risk customers.

But with the virus still not contained, some shoppers are avoiding leisure shopping altogether.

“They are ensuring that customers wear PPE or follow social distancing but I don't see a need to shop if there is no need,” said Michell Tinoco, a college student who recovered from the virus. “I will only go to a store in dire circumstances.”

Korean soccer team apologizes for apparently setting up sex dolls in stands

Mannequins sit in seats to "cheer on" South Korea's FC Seoul during a match against Gwangju FC on May 17, 2020.Yonhap / via Reuters

South Korean soccer club FC Seoul apologized, expressing "sincere remorse," after it was accused of placing sex dolls in empty seats during a match.

Pro baseball and soccer have returned to Korea with leagues playing in empty stadiums until the risks of coronavirus infections are lowered. With players competing in front of empty seats, some soccer and baseball teams have been trying to create a festive and humorous atmosphere by filling stands with huge team banners, pictures of mask-wearing fans, or even vegetables.

FC Seoul said it was attempting to add “an element of fun,” during Sunday’s 1-0 win over visiting Gwangju FC, with the mannequins provided by Dalkom,  

The club didn’t directly address criticism of why it chose to work with Dalkom, which does manufacture sex dolls, according to the company’s website, or why nearly all the mannequins at the stadium were female in design.

Dutch health officials release new COVID-19 sex guidelines

The Dutch government has released new guidelines on sex during COVID-19, suggesting "sex with yourself or with others at a distance" among other recommendations published on its health ministry's website amid the relaxation of some lockdown rules. 

The new guidance, which was issued on by the Dutch National Institute for Health and Environment on May 16, acknowledges that it is "logical" for single people to seek physical contact, but advises minimizing risks by picking just one partner and discussing "how best to do this together.” Couples are reminded to avoid sex with partners who have been self-isolating because of coronavirus symptoms, with officials going as far to suggest safer at-distance alternatives.

Lockdown rules in the Netherlands are being relaxed countrywide as part of a four-phase plan announced by Prime Minister Mark Rutte at the end of April. COVID-19 has caused 5,680 deaths in the country so far, with 43,995 cases reported, according to John Hopkins University.

Time off school could reduce kids' career earnings by 4%, research group warns

A research group in Germany warned Monday that students whose school years are significantly shortened because of the coronavirus pandemic risk lower incomes throughout their career.

The analysis by the Muncih-based ifo Institute showed that kids who lose a third of study time in one school year will on average receive around 3 to 4 percent less income over their professional lives. By looking at previously shortened school years, because of strikes and other interruptions, the ifo Institute found that individual student's study habits vary greatly during the downtime, with some barely studying at all.

"We must do all we can to ensure that all children and young people start studying again immediately — whether they're going to school or not," Ludger Woessmann, director of the ifo Center for the Economics of Education, wrote in the research group's monthly journal, ifo Schnelldienst.

Blood donations in five Southern states to be tested for coronavirus antibodies

Blood donations given through the not-for-profit blood center OneBlood will be tested for COVID-19 antibodies in a five Southern states, the organization announced on Monday. 

Donors in Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama will be tested using an FDA-approved method that will indicate whether the donor's immune system has produced antibodies for the virus. It's thought that many people may have been exposed to the virus without ever showing symptoms. Donors will find out the results 48 hours after donating.

"In addition to donors learning if they have the antibody, OneBlood will be identifying additional people who can be COVID-19 convalescent plasma donors," said OneBlood Senior Vice President Susan Forbes. Convalescent plasma can help treat people critically ill with coronavirus.