World Health Organization records worst day

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
Image: A couple wait to exchange marriage vows at one of six pop-up socially distanced marriage booths in the parking lot of the Honda Center amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 19, 2020 in Anaheim, California.
A couple wait to exchange marriage vows at one of six pop-up socially distanced marriage booths in the parking lot of the Honda Center amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 19, 2020 in Anaheim, California.Mario Tama / Getty Images

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The globe recorded it worst single-day of coronavirus cases, more than 100,000, since the beginning of the outbreak, the director-general of the World Health Organization said Wednesday.

The countries with the highest numbers of confirmed cases are the U.S., Russia, Brazil and the U.K., according to the WHO.

On the same day, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention quietly published a 60-page document that recommends precautions for reopening the nation's restaurants, mass transit, schools and child care programs.

The CDC cautioned that, depending on the number of COVID-19 cases in a particular region, not all businesses and institutions should reopen just yet.

Joe Biden said Wednesday it's "totally irresponsible" for President Donald Trump to be taking and touting the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a way to prevent COVID-19.

"There's no serious medical personnel out there saying to use that drug, it's counterproductive, it's not going to help," Biden said Tuesday in a virtual Yahoo News event with chef Jose Andres.

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

This live coverage has ended. Continue to May 21 coronavirus updates.

WHO reports most coronavirus cases in one day as total number nears 5 million

The intensive care unit for coronavirus patients at Vinogradov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow on May 17, 2020.Dimitar Dilkoff / AFP - Getty Images

More than 100,000 coronavirus cases have been reported to the World Health Organization in the last 24 hours, "the most in a single day since the outbreak began," Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said at a news conference Wednesday.

"We still have a long way to go in this pandemic," he said. "In the last 24 hours, there have been 106,000 cases reported to WHO — the most in a single day since the outbreak began."

He added that almost "two-thirds of these cases were reported in just four countries," although he did not specify where the cases had been recorded.

The countries with the highest number of confirmed cases are the U.S., Russia, Brazil and the United Kingdom, according to the WHO.

Read the full story here. 

100-year-old U.K. fundraising phenomenon Captain Tom earns knighthood

World War II veteran Tom Moore raised millions for the coronavirus-battling National Health Service, and has since been made an honorary colonel and member of the England cricket team.

Anti-lockdown demonstrators trade guns for scissors at Michigan 'haircut' protest

Annette Rafacz gives Manny Orovcoa a free haircut at the State Capitol during a rally in Lansing, Mich., on May 20, 2020.Paul Sancya / AP

Hundreds of protesters turned out to protest Michigan's stay-at-home order on Wednesday — and get free haircuts.

Toting signs that read "End tyranny," "Live free or die" and accused Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of "killing small businesses," demonstrators rallied outside of the state Capitol in Lansing as part of "Operation Haircut."

Several barbers were in attendance, giving free trims to demonstrators. Some of the barbers and protesters were not wearing face coverings. Many of the demonstrators also stood within 6 feet of one another as they waited for their cuts.

Read the full story here. 

CDC quietly releases detailed plan for reopening America

Maria Iraola wipes down the sidewalk tables of the Argentino Las Olas restaurant as it prepares to open to customers on May 18, 2020 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Restaurants and bars should consider installing sneeze guards at their registers. Mass transit workers should close every other row of seats on their buses. Students should eat lunch in their classrooms instead of congregating in a cafeteria.

These are among the social distancing measures that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention listed in a document it quietly released on its website this week outlining recommendations for reopening restaurants, mass transit, schools and childcare programs across the United States amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The detailed 60-page document was posted on the CDC’s website with no accompanying announcement from the public health agency, and comes weeks after many states have already ended or partially ended their lockdowns.

Read the full story here. 

Daytime Emmys rescheduled for June 26 as virtual ceremony

In yet another sign of the times, the 47th annual Daytime Emmy Awards will go virtual this year.

Awards in leading categories will be presented June 26 on CBS with recipients and other special guests appearing from home. Additional categories will be announced simultaneously on Twitter and others will be presented in a separate ceremony in July. 

“In these challenging times, daytime has been a primary influence in staying connected with its audience, entertaining them and keeping them informed,” said David McKenzie, Daytime Emmys executive producer and director of Associated Television International. “We are honored to be a part of it. We are also excited for the challenge of introducing a new format that will celebrate the contributions of daytime television.”

Nominations will be announced Thursday, May 21, on CBS' "The Talk" and then online at Entertainment Tonight

At last: CDC guidelines on reopening businesses, schools are released

Weeks after a draft of guidelines for reopening businesses across the U.S. were leaked from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the final plans have been released. 

The 60-page guidelines include details about what child care facilities, schools, restaurants and business need to do to keep people safe. Measures include cleaning and disinfection, social distancing, and monitoring for possible reemergence of infections. The document also includes criteria and thresholds for states to meet as they go through the three phases of reopening. 

Read the full CDC guidelines.

Video shows Costco worker calmly handle customer berating him over mask policy

A Costco employee is being lauded online for his handling of an encounter with a customer who recorded himself berating the worker and refusing to wear a mask.

video of the incident posted to Twitter on Monday has been viewed millions of times and highlights a reality for many retail workers who are having to enforce stores' rules and public health guidelines on masks. The original video was posted on Instagram before it was deleted.

Costco requires every employee and customer in its stores to wear a mask that covers the mouth and nose to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

In the 37-second video, which has more than 6.8 million views, a customer who appears to be in a checkout line can be heard telling a Costco employee whose name tag says Tison, "I'll just put you on my 3,000-follower Instagram feed, mostly locals."

Read the full story here.

New York unveils contest finalists for video to boost mask wearing

New York state hopes a public service announcement will encourage more residents to consistently wear face coverings when they are outside of their homes.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and daughter Mariah Kennedy-Cuomo unveiled five finalist videos out of several hundred submissions, with the winner to be selected through online voting.

Balloting in the "Wear a Mask New York Ad Contest" runs from now until Monday, and the chosen ad will be announced Tuesday.

House committee to hear from HHS watchdog who identified hospital supply shortages

Christi A. Grimm, the principal deputy inspector general for the Department of Health and Human Services, will testify before the House Oversight Committee on Tuesday, a staffer on the committee told NBC News.

She is expected to brief the panel on her office’s work on coronavirus and other aspects of the administration's response to the pandemic.

In early April, Grimm presented President Donald Trump with a report showing that hospitals responding to the pandemic were lacking vital medical equipment including thermometers and test kits.

Trump criticized Grimm in a tweet and then eventually nominated a new IG to replace her. Grimm was not fired and remains in a senior role at the IGs office.

The committee notes this will take the form of a briefing and not a hearing. It will also take place entirely remote over video conference.

NYC's low-income neighborhoods hardest hit by coronavirus

NBC News

New York City's low-income neighborhoods with large minority populations have been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic, state officials said Wednesday.

Based on 8,000 antibody tests administered recently in the city, 19.9 percent came up positive, indicating infections, with several neighborhoods outside Manhattan showing higher-than-average rates, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at a news conference.

The Morrisania neighborhood of the Bronx showed an infection rate of 43 percent; Brownsville, Brooklyn,  41 percent; the East Bronx, 38 percent; and the Hollis neighborhood in Queens, 35 percent, the state found.

"Focus on low-income communities, do the testing and do the outreach," Cuomo said. "That’s where the cases are coming from. ... That's where you're going to see the highest number of deaths."  

U.S. pledges $162 million more in COVID-19 foreign assistance, bringing total to over $1 billion

The State Department announced on Wednesday that the U.S. government has pledged an additional $162 million in foreign aid to fight the coronavirus, bringing the total to more than $1 billion.

The new funding will continue to support hygiene, sanitation and safe water, but for the first time will also pay for emergency food assistance, since the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted global food supply chains.