World Health Organization records worst day

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
Image: A couple wait to exchange marriage vows at one of six pop-up socially distanced marriage booths in the parking lot of the Honda Center amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 19, 2020 in Anaheim, California.
A couple wait to exchange marriage vows at one of six pop-up socially distanced marriage booths in the parking lot of the Honda Center amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 19, 2020 in Anaheim, California.Mario Tama / Getty Images

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The globe recorded it worst single-day of coronavirus cases, more than 100,000, since the beginning of the outbreak, the director-general of the World Health Organization said Wednesday.

The countries with the highest numbers of confirmed cases are the U.S., Russia, Brazil and the U.K., according to the WHO.

On the same day, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention quietly published a 60-page document that recommends precautions for reopening the nation's restaurants, mass transit, schools and child care programs.

The CDC cautioned that, depending on the number of COVID-19 cases in a particular region, not all businesses and institutions should reopen just yet.

Joe Biden said Wednesday it's "totally irresponsible" for President Donald Trump to be taking and touting the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a way to prevent COVID-19.

"There's no serious medical personnel out there saying to use that drug, it's counterproductive, it's not going to help," Biden said Tuesday in a virtual Yahoo News event with chef Jose Andres.

Here's what to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

This live coverage has ended. Continue to May 21 coronavirus updates.

Brazil's coronavirus outbreak grows amid government tension

Coronavirus is spreading faster in Brazil than anywhere else on Earth. Doctors at a disease control center say there’s so little testing, the real number of cases could be 15 times higher. President Jair Bolsonaro, when asked about the rising death toll, said he “can’t work miracles.”

California to issue guidance on restarting Hollywood, Tyler Perry unveils plan to reopen Atlanta studio

California will roll out guidelines on Memorial Day for TV, film and commercials to resume production amid the coronavirus pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday on a call with entertainment industry leaders.

"We're in real time drafting guidelines related to productions … because we anticipate rolling out on Monday, May 25th, some sectoral guidelines that would allow these counties to begin to move forward and allow some modification, allow some work to be done, allow some movement in your industry," Newsom said.

Hollywood has been at a total standstill since mid-March when Newsom issued a statewide stay-at-home order. As a result, hundreds of thousands of workers have lost their jobs and studios are scrambling to fill an unprecedented content demand from people binging shows and movies at home. 

Also on Wednesday, Tyler Perry unveiled a 30-page document for his plan to resume productions at Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta. He will require cast and crew members to be tested for coronavirus and self-isolate at home before traveling to Georgia, undergo social distancing as much as possible on set and not leave the "quarantine bubble" at any time for the designated two-week filming period.

"I want it to be abundantly clear that there was no way I could or would consider putting people back to work without a plan that takes extreme measures to try and mitigate as much risk as possible in our productions, and I think we’ve managed to do just that," Perry said in a letter to crew members.

Missouri grocery store repurposed salad bar to serve mini bottles of liquor

A Dierbergs location in Arnold, Mo., created a tiki bar where its salad bar once was.Courtesy of Dierbergs

When a grocery store was forced to close its signature salad bar to reduce the risk of spreading the coronavirus, some of its employees got creative and built an alcohol display in its wake.

"We had originally put out other fresh foods, but it didn't go over so well because everyone's been stressed out," said Rick Rodemacher, the store director of Dierbergs Markets' Manchester, Missouri location.

"A group of the employees were talking and we thought we could make good use of the empty space and make people smile if we swapped out the salad bar for one that serves alcohol."

Read the full story here. 

Highway deaths soar amid pandemic as people get 'the itch to drive faster'

Highway fatality rates jumped 14 percent in March, even as U.S. roadways began emptying due to the near-nationwide coronavirus quarantine.

With significantly fewer vehicles on the road, the total number of deaths dropped an estimated 8 percent, but measured in terms of deaths per 100 million vehicle miles driven, the figure for March surged to 1.22 compared to 1.07 in March 2019, according to the National Safety Council.

Seven states posted double-digit increases, the NSC reported, with Connecticut seeing a 42 percent spike. Police across the U.S. have been reporting major increases in speeding citations and arrests, with fewer fender benders — but significant increases in severe crashes.

“People on the road have been getting the itch to drive faster,” said Susanna Gotsch, director of industry analysis for CCC Information Services, which consults with insurance companies on auto crashes.

Overall, total U.S. highway deaths rose 2 percent during the first quarter of 2019, according to the NSC.

ACLU files lawsuit over Puerto Rico 'fake news' laws feared by journalists covering pandemic

A drive-thru checkpoint to perform tests that detect COVID-19 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on April 16, 2020.Carlos Giusti / AP file

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the Puerto Rican government over what the group called a pair of “fake news” laws that it says authorities can use to punish reporters covering the coronavirus pandemic.

The suit, brought in federal district court, was filed on behalf of two journalists, Sandra Rodríguez Cotto and Rafelli González-Cotto. Gov. Wanda Vázquez Garced and other officials are named as defendants.

According to court documents, one of the provisions criminalizes raising “a false alarm” over an imminent catastrophe, during a state of emergency, or to “spread rumors” about “non-existing abnormalities.”

Read the full story here.

WHO reports most coronavirus cases in one day as total number nears 5 million

The intensive care unit for coronavirus patients at Vinogradov City Clinical Hospital in Moscow on May 17, 2020.Dimitar Dilkoff / AFP - Getty Images

More than 100,000 coronavirus cases have been reported to the World Health Organization in the last 24 hours, "the most in a single day since the outbreak began," Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said at a news conference Wednesday.

"We still have a long way to go in this pandemic," he said. "In the last 24 hours, there have been 106,000 cases reported to WHO — the most in a single day since the outbreak began."

He added that almost "two-thirds of these cases were reported in just four countries," although he did not specify where the cases had been recorded.

The countries with the highest number of confirmed cases are the U.S., Russia, Brazil and the United Kingdom, according to the WHO.

Read the full story here. 

100-year-old U.K. fundraising phenomenon Captain Tom earns knighthood

World War II veteran Tom Moore raised millions for the coronavirus-battling National Health Service, and has since been made an honorary colonel and member of the England cricket team.

Anti-lockdown demonstrators trade guns for scissors at Michigan 'haircut' protest

Annette Rafacz gives Manny Orovcoa a free haircut at the State Capitol during a rally in Lansing, Mich., on May 20, 2020.Paul Sancya / AP

Hundreds of protesters turned out to protest Michigan's stay-at-home order on Wednesday — and get free haircuts.

Toting signs that read "End tyranny," "Live free or die" and accused Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of "killing small businesses," demonstrators rallied outside of the state Capitol in Lansing as part of "Operation Haircut."

Several barbers were in attendance, giving free trims to demonstrators. Some of the barbers and protesters were not wearing face coverings. Many of the demonstrators also stood within 6 feet of one another as they waited for their cuts.

Read the full story here. 

CDC quietly releases detailed plan for reopening America

Maria Iraola wipes down the sidewalk tables of the Argentino Las Olas restaurant as it prepares to open to customers on May 18, 2020 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Restaurants and bars should consider installing sneeze guards at their registers. Mass transit workers should close every other row of seats on their buses. Students should eat lunch in their classrooms instead of congregating in a cafeteria.

These are among the social distancing measures that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention listed in a document it quietly released on its website this week outlining recommendations for reopening restaurants, mass transit, schools and childcare programs across the United States amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The detailed 60-page document was posted on the CDC’s website with no accompanying announcement from the public health agency, and comes weeks after many states have already ended or partially ended their lockdowns.

Read the full story here. 

Daytime Emmys rescheduled for June 26 as virtual ceremony

In yet another sign of the times, the 47th annual Daytime Emmy Awards will go virtual this year.

Awards in leading categories will be presented June 26 on CBS with recipients and other special guests appearing from home. Additional categories will be announced simultaneously on Twitter and others will be presented in a separate ceremony in July. 

“In these challenging times, daytime has been a primary influence in staying connected with its audience, entertaining them and keeping them informed,” said David McKenzie, Daytime Emmys executive producer and director of Associated Television International. “We are honored to be a part of it. We are also excited for the challenge of introducing a new format that will celebrate the contributions of daytime television.”

Nominations will be announced Thursday, May 21, on CBS' "The Talk" and then online at Entertainment Tonight

At last: CDC guidelines on reopening businesses, schools are released

Weeks after a draft of guidelines for reopening businesses across the U.S. were leaked from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the final plans have been released. 

The 60-page guidelines include details about what child care facilities, schools, restaurants and business need to do to keep people safe. Measures include cleaning and disinfection, social distancing, and monitoring for possible reemergence of infections. The document also includes criteria and thresholds for states to meet as they go through the three phases of reopening. 

Read the full CDC guidelines.