U.S. cases top 2 million

Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the world.
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Indonesians spend time at a shopping mall that applies social and physical distancing with a plastic divider and lane direction amid the coronavirus pandemic in Surabaya on June 10, 2020.Juni Kriswanto / AFP - Getty Images

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As states have reopened businesses and life in the U.S. is starting to regain a sense of normalcy, a leading health expert is warning "we are still in a pandemic" and confirmed cases of coronavirus in the U.S. topped 2 million on Wednesday.

Many people remain vulnerable to the disease, and the pandemic will continue as long as there's a readily transmissible virus and a population with little or no immunity to it, said Dr. Jay Butler, head of the COVID-19 response at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The news comes as the U.S. is now officially in a recession, bringing an end to a historic 128 months of economic growth.

Here's what you need to know about the coronavirus, plus a timeline of the most critical moments:

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 11 coronavirus news here.

Russian chefs in naked lockdown protest after virus strips them of income

Employees of the Funky Food 11 restaurant wearing face masks pose naked to draw attention to a crisis in the restaurant industry caused by the lockdown measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Krasnodar, Russia. Funky Food 11 / Reuters

Families of Italian COVID-19 victims file complaints with prosecutor

A number of families of victims of the COVID-19 outbreak in the Italian region of Bergamo, one of the hardest hit during the epidemic, filed complaints with the local prosecutor Wednesday, the committee coordinating the efforts told NBC News. 

The complaints concern issues including the lack of information provided around infection risk in the early stages of the pandemic, the lack of PPE available in healthcare facilities and the lack of medicine for managing COVID-19 symptoms at home. 

Luca Fusco, the committee's president, as well as relatives of some of the victims and their lawyers, delivered the first 50 complaints to Bergamo's prosecutor Wednesday morning. Lawyers acting for the victims are examining nearly 200 complaints, so more submissions could follow. 

"We have a duty to give our fathers, our mothers and our families the justice they deserve," Fusco said. 

It's official: The U.S. entered a recession in February

The economic expansion would have turned 11 years old this month — a span unmatched in the postwar economy.Cindy Ord / Getty Images file

The U.S. is officially in a recession, bringing an end to a historic 128 months of economic growth, after the coronavirus pandemic swept the country and shut down the economy.

For more than a decade, the American economy seemed to contradict the adage "What goes up, must come down." That ended in February, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, or NBER, the agency that identifies periods of economic growth and contraction.

The economic expansion would have turned 11 years old this month — a span unmatched in the postwar economy.

Read the full story here. 

AMC Theaters plans July reopening

AMC Theaters, the largest theater chain in the nation, said Tuesday it planned to reopen all its locations in July.

The 1,000-venue company, which already reopened several screens in Norway, Germany, Spain and Portugal, is planning to reopen its U.S. and U.K. theaters in time to show "Tenet," scheduled to be released July 17.

In a statement, the chain said it would limit capacity, block off seating, require personal protective equipment and institute cleaning protocols.

Competitor Cinemark also plans to reopen its 345 theaters in time for "Tenet." A phased reopening would begin June 19 in some locations, CEO Mark Zoradi said in a statement Wednesday.

Initially, venues would be run at 50 percent capacity, he said previously.

Fauci: HIV is "really simple" compared to COVID-19

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and long-time HIV researcher, said Tuesday that COVID-19 appears to be more complicated than HIV.

"I thought HIV was a complicated disease," Fauci said during a presentation at the BIO International Convention, which included members of biotechnology companies. "It’s really simple compared to what’s going on with COVID-19."

Fauci was referring to the range of illness COVID-19 can cause, in which some people can be infected but never develop any symptoms, some can have fevers, cough and debilitating fatigue for weeks, and still others wind up fighting for their lives on a ventilator. 

"When is it going to end?" Fauci asked, adding that scientists are at the very beginning of understanding how COVID-19 works. 

"What are the long-term negative effects of infection? We don’t have enough experience because we’ve only been involved for four months," he said. "We don’t know the extent of full recovery or partial recovery. So, there’s a lot we need to learn."

Best Buy to reopen most locations for in-store shoppers by June 15

More than 800 Best Buy store locations will reopen to shoppers beginning June 15 under strict social distancing guidelines that will limit the number of people in stores, the company announced on Tuesday.

The country's biggest consumer electronics retail company has been operating on an appointment-only model during the coronavirus crisis. 

It will also bring back more than 9,000 furloughed full- and part-time employees.

"Throughout the pandemic, nothing has been more important to us than the safety of our customers and employees,” said Ray Sliva, Best Buy’s president of retail. “We’re now confident we can provide a safe experience for shoppers who want to visit our stores.”

Best Buy, which is based in the Minneapolis area, plans to reopen stores at 25 percent capacity to allow for social distancing. Stores will also be outfitted with floor signage to guide customers and enforce the six feet of distance at all times.

All employees will be required to undergo self-health assessments and temperature checks through Best Buy’s app. Employees and shoppers will be required to wear masks while shopping. The company is also enhancing its sanitation procedures and has installed sneeze guards at checkout counters.

Washington, D.C. National Guardsmen test positive for COVID-19

The D.C. National Guard says that some of its members have tested positive for COVID-19 since it was mobilized to respond to the protests over George Floyd’s death in Washington, but would not disclose how many had tested positive because of what a Guard official called "operational security."

As of Monday, June 1, the entire D.C. National Guard, which has 3,400 members, had been activated to assist in the response to protests. Members of the National Guard from other states were brought into the capital as well, including South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida, Utah and Indiana.

"National Guard personnel are social distancing and use of PPE measures remained in place where practical throughout the entire National Guard support to assist local and federal law enforcement responding to the civil unrest in the District of Columbia," the branch said in a statement. "All Guardsmen who are suspected to be at high risk of infection or have tested positive for COVID-19 during demobilization will not be released...until risk of infection or illness has passed."

World Health Organization confirms asymptomatic spread of coronavirus

"I am absolutely convinced that that is occurring. The question is how much," said WHO Executive Director Dr. Michael Ryan.

New Jersey governor lifts state's stay-at-home order

The governor of New Jersey lifted his stay-at-home order as the state continues to make progress in its fight against the coronavirus. 

At his daily news briefing on Tuesday, Gov. Phil Murphy announced that he was ending the order, but still encouraged the use of masks and other safety measures. 

"Please continue to be responsible and safe. Wear face coverings and keep a social distance from others when out in public," the governor said in a tweet. 

New Jersey had been under a stay-at-home order since March 21. Murphy on Tuesday also signed an executive order raising the limit on outdoor gatherings to 100 people and indoor gatherings to either 25 percent capacity or 50 people.