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First skull of giant panda ancestor found

The first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda was been discovered in China, researchers report.
A 2-million-year-old panda skull fossil found in China, left, is compared to a modern-day giant panda skull. This is the first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda, researchers report.
A 2-million-year-old panda skull fossil found in China, left, is compared to a modern-day giant panda skull. This is the first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda, researchers report. Institute of Vertebrate Paleont
/ Source: The Associated Press

The first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda was been discovered in China, researchers report.

Discovery of the skull, estimated to be at least 2 million years old, is reported by Russell L. Ciochon in Tuesday's edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Ciochon, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa, and a team of U.S. and Chinese researchers, made the find in a limestone cave in south China.

The animal, formally known as Ailuropoda microta, or "pygmy giant panda," would have been about three feet long, compared to the modern giant panda, which averages in excess of five feet.

Previously this animal had been known only by a few teeth and bones, but a skull had never been found.

** HOLD FOR RELEASE 5 P.M. EDT. (2100 GMT) THIS PHOTO MAY NOT BE POSTED ONLINE, BROADCAST OR PUBLISHED BEFORE 5 P.M. EDT. ** This image released by the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing shows the left side view of a new fossil panda skull, Ailuropoda microta, from Jinyin Cave, Guangxi, China. The first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda was been discovered in China, researchers report. Discovery of the skull, estimated to be at least 2 million years old, is reported by Russell L. Ciochon in the Tuesday June 19, 2007 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (AP Photo/ Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing) ** NO SALES **Institute of Vertebrate Paleont

Judging by the wear patterns on its teeth it also lived on a diet of bamboo, the main food of the current giant panda, the researchers said.

Other than size, the animal was anatomically similar to today's giant panda, said Ciochon, pronounced, pronounced schuh-HON.

The work was funded by the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation and University of Iowa.