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North, south Sudan reach agreement on peace issues

Representatives of north and south Sudan reached agreement Wednesday on several disputed issues in a 2005 peace agreement that ended two decades of civil war, including border demarcation and the future of a disputed oil-rich region, the official news agency said.
/ Source: The Associated Press

Representatives of north and south Sudan reached agreement Wednesday on several disputed issues in a 2005 peace agreement that ended two decades of civil war, including border demarcation and the future of a disputed oil-rich region, the official news agency said.

The U.S. has been pushing both sides to settle their differences, and Washington's special envoy to Sudan, Scott Gration, witnessed the signing of the new bilateral agreement in the southern city of Juba, according to a statement issued by the U.S. State Department.

The statement says the agreement commits the two sides "to a series of timed benchmarks for implementing key aspects of the CPA, including border demarcation and election preparation." The peace deal is known as the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA.

The new agreement also settles differences over the disputed oil-rich region of Abyei, the official Sudan News Agency reported, without providing details. An international legal panel requested by the two sides drew a compromise map in July that split Abyei between the north and south.

The State Department said the two sides have still been unable to reach agreement on several issues, including a final determination on the use of census data critical in determining how political power, oil and other natural wealth are shared in Sudan.

The unresolved issues will be taken up in another round of discussion that will take place during the second week of September, said SUNA.