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Gov. Optimistic About Scholarship

Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm said Friday she is still optimistic about the future of the Promise Scholarship, despite a recent vote by state lawmakers that would cut funding for the program.
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Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm said Friday she is still optimistic about the future of the Promise Scholarship, despite a recent vote by state lawmakers that would cut funding for the program.

Granholm has urged students and their parents to stick with the program, but several students said Friday, without the extra money, their futures are uncertain.

“I think it’s going to prevent me from taking as many classes as I wanted to take,” said Adia Abusbeih, a freshman at Wayne State University.

Abusbeih said the cuts are disappointing because she did exactly what Granholm was encouraging students to do: enroll in a field that is hiring and use the Promise Scholarship money to pay for it.

According to Abusbeih, her tutition is $9,000 a year and she expects to lose $1,000 in Promise Scholarship money.

“I’m actually going to go to work part-time next semester so that I don’t have to take loans or anything like that to repay the money,” Abusbeih said.

Abusbeih said working part-time will mean it will take longer for her to finish college, but that without the scholarship help she has no choice.

Granholm said Friday she believes lawmakers will find a way to provide help to students.

“There’s a way to fix this,” Granholm said. “The Senate has passed some revenue bills over to the House, and the House has passed the ‘fixing of the promise (scholarship)’ to the Senate. We just have to bring the two sides together. This one is doable.”

Abusbeih said the situation should have never gotten to this point. “Why would somebody promise a bunch of students a scholarship and not realize that they might not have enough money to give scholarships out?” she said.