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Tropical storm has brief run in Atlantic

Tropical Storm Colin has degenerated into a tropical low, but forecasters say it could still reenergize before hitting the U.S. Atlantic seaboard next week.
Image: This National Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad
This satellite image shows Tropical Storm Colin, right of center, on Tuesday morning.HO / NOAA via AFP - Getty Images
/ Source: msnbc.com news services

Tropical Storm Colin has degenerated into a tropical low, but forecasters say it could still re-energize before hitting the U.S. Atlantic seaboard next week.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said Tuesday the remnants of Colin had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph Tuesday, which are comparable to those of a tropical storm. But the system lacks a defined center or the circular movement characteristic of a tropical storm.

Forecasters said the system could likely be reenergized in a few days when it moves into a more favorable environment.

The system is located about 540 miles east of the Leeward Islands and is moving west-northwest near 35 mph.

Colin formed earlier Tuesday as the third tropical storm of the Atlantic hurricane season.

The storm was expected to keep away from the Gulf of Mexico, where U.S. oil and natural gas operations are concentrated and where BP Plc is working to permanently seal a ruptured oil well that caused the biggest offshore spill in U.S. history.

Tropical Storm Bonnie briefly interrupted work on BP's oil spill site last week, after the well was temporarily capped, and the oil company hopes to have a permanent plug in place before hurricane season enters its peak period Aug. 15.