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Ariane rocket blasts off for space station delivery

KOUROU, French Guiana (Reuters) -- A European Ariane rocket blasted off from French Guiana on Wednesday carrying supplies to the International Space Station (ISS), space officials said.
/ Source: Reuters

KOUROU, French Guiana — A European Ariane rocket blasted off from French Guiana on Wednesday carrying supplies to the International Space Station (ISS), space officials said.

Constructed by an industrial consortium led by EADS Astrium, a division of European industrial giant EADS, the unmanned vessel is designed to deliver fuel, food, clothing and oxygen to the ISS crew as well as spare parts.

A first attempt to launch the rocket was scrubbed on Tuesday because of a technical problem. The cargo vessel is scheduled to dock with the ISS in eight days.

The vessel, dubbed "Johannes Kepler" in honor of the 17th-century German astronomer and mathematician, is the second Automatic Transfer Vehicle (ATV) Europe has contributed to the ISS program. The first docked with the ISS in early 2008.

Billed by the European Space Agency (ESA) as a major challenge for Europe's space program, the ATV docks with the ISS without human intervention.

"The precision of the ATV is tremendous compared to the mass of the vehicle," Nico Dettmann, ESA's ATV Programme Manager said in a television interview. "We have redesigned the (cargo) racks and every rack is 50 kg (110 pounds) lighter," he said.

The ATV has three times the cargo capacity of Russia's Progress vehicle and was developed by the ESA as part of a barter arrangement with the U.S. space agency NASA.

Instead of paying cash for its share of the station's operating costs and also to secure additional astronaut access, ESA is providing the ATV and other components.

"A full ATV mission costs around 350 million Euros ($475 million), the ATV spacecraft itself accounting for around 200 million Euros ($270 million)," Pal Hvistendahl, ESA spokesman told Reuters.

"The program that led to the development, manufacturing, qualification and launch of ATV-1 (launched in 2008) cost 1.3 billion Euros ($1.75 billion)," he said.

Four more ATVs are planned for the space station, and NASA may buy more with the ESA as its space shuttle fleet is due to be retired this year.

The space station, which is about 85 percent complete, is a $100 billion project by 15 nations.