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Report: Law change may spark new Lockerbie trial

Lockerbie bombing defendant Al-Amin Khalifa Fhimah speaks to the media with Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi after being acquitted.
Lockerbie bombing defendant Al-Amin Khalifa Fhimah (L) speaks to the media with Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi after arriving a day after being acquitted in the Lockerbie bombing trial February 1, 2001 in Tripoli. Courtney Kealy / Getty Images, file
/ Source: msnbc.com

A new Scottish law could pave the way for a Libyan who was found not guilty in the Lockerbie bombing case to be put on trial again, according to a report.

The Scotsman newspaper reported Tuesday that prosecutors are examining new evidence against Al-Amin Khalifa Fhimah, 55. He was found not guilty in 2001 in connection with the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. All 207 people on board were killed.

The Crown Office is trying to establish whether the evidence is strong enough to implement the Double Jeopardy Act, The Scotsman said.

The law was reformed in March, to allow for a second trial if new evidence would "substantially strengthen the case against the accused," according to Scotland's government website.

Al-Megrahi was convicted on 207 counts of murder and sentenced to life in prison.

He was released on compassionate grounds in 2009 after doctors said he had only months to live. However, he is still alive.