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Cheney gets good news during checkup

Vice President Dick Cheney, who has a history of heart problems, underwent a regular cardiovascular checkup at a Washington hospital Tuesday and later emerged with good news from his doctor, a spokesman said.
/ Source: Reuters

Vice President Dick Cheney, who has a history of heart problems, underwent a regular cardiovascular checkup at a Washington hospital Tuesday and later emerged with good news from his doctor, a spokesman said.

Cheney, 63, spent part of the morning having an EKG, an echocardiogram and a stress test at George Washington University Medical Center. He resumed his regular duties before midday.

“The vice president was told by his doctor that all the news was very good,” said Cheney spokesman Kevin Kellems.

Cheney has had four heart attacks since 1978, none while serving as vice president. His most recent was in November 2000.

In 2001, he had an electrical device called a cardioverter defibrillator implanted in his chest. The pager-size device is designed to control Cheney’s heart rate but has never had to operate.

“The doctor informed the vice president that the device neither detected nor treated any arrhythmia,” Kellems said.

Cheney’s last regular heart checkup was in July 2003. Vice President Dick Cheney was undergoing a routine exam Tuesday to check on a pacemaker placed in his chest in June 2001.

Spokesman Kevin Kellems said Monday that the tests at George Washington University Medical Center would include a physical exam, an electrocardiogram, an echocardiogram and a stress test. They are noninvasive procedures and the vice president planned to be back at work by midday, he said.

“It’s a routine check not triggered by any event,” Kellems said.

Cheney has had four heart attacks, though none as vice president. His last checkup was in July 2003, and determined that his pacemaker, called an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, was working fine and had never had to be activiated. The devise is designed to activiate automatically if needed to regulate the patient’s heartbeat.