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House (un)divided?

Every new Congressional class comes to Washington, D.C., with the intent to change the way politics are done, but the freshmen class of 2012 are actually trying to do something about it.
/ Source: The Daily Rundown

Every new Congressional class comes to Washington, D.C., with the intent to change the way politics are done, but the freshmen class of 2012 are actually trying to do something about it.

November’s election brought more than 80 new members to Congress this year. As they get to know the ways of Washington, they’re also doing something that some say could help to make Capitol Hill more productive: Trying to get to know each other.

The efforts kicked off Friday with a presentation by Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who spoke to more than 60 freshmen from both sides of the aisle. The newest batch of freshmen are hoping for more civility with their colleagues than has been on display in recent years.

Chuck Todd spoke with freshmen Rep. Matt Cartwright, D-Penn., and Rep. Luke Messer, R-Ind.,on Monday’s show as part of The Daily Rundown’s ongoing series introducing all of the new House members.

“What we understand is there are a lot more things that we will agree on if we spend more time together,” said Cartwright. “We’ll at least come to respect each other and enjoy each other’s company.”

Cartwright is one of four presidents of the Democrats’ freshman class along with Reps. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas,  John Delaney, D-Md., and Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M.

“It’s much harder to demonize someone that you like,” said Messer, who serves as the Republican freshman class president. “We can work together if we get to know each other. “