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Swarms of Flies Invade Part of Clinton County

Sugar Valley, Clinton County- Hospitality is wearing in thin in Clinton County's Sugar Valley. People who live there are more than ready for their most recent visitors to leave.Swarms of flies first began invading the area in June, and the problem has just gotten worse. This summer's hot and stick weather is creating the perfect environment for them to thrive.Barb Sweeney lives in Logan Mills, where the infestation is particularly bad. "They get in your face, and they get in your tea," she said.Residents are doing everything they can to protect their homes from the flying pests. Many of them are buying fly stripping, and spending hundreds of dollars in the process. But even so, they say they're barely keeping the flies at bay.Lester Miller lives in Loganton, and isn't happy he has to hang the fly strips. "I don't like doing it -- it's a thing I have to do every morning. It's not the easiest thing to do," he said.Residents have been working with county officials to resolve the problem. They discovered the flies are coming from nearby chicken farms. Their manure is the perfect home for fly larvae. The hatched flies will then travel more than two miles away in search of a new place to call home.Chemicals can be sprayed on the manure to kill the larvae, but many of the farms in the area are organic. The farm near Barb Sweeney's home is just that -- an organic chicken farm.Clinton county officials do say many of the Amish farmers in the area are being cooperative. They say getting rid of the infestation is a community effort, and politicians, farmers, and homeowners are all working together to alleviate the problem.Unfortunately, many people are saying it's too late to completely get rid of the infestation until the weather changes."We're praying for snow and heavy frost," Sweeney said.
/ Source: WBRE

Sugar Valley, Clinton County- Hospitality is wearing in thin in Clinton County's Sugar Valley. People who live there are more than ready for their most recent visitors to leave.Swarms of flies first began invading the area in June, and the problem has just gotten worse. This summer's hot and stick weather is creating the perfect environment for them to thrive.Barb Sweeney lives in Logan Mills, where the infestation is particularly bad. "They get in your face, and they get in your tea," she said.Residents are doing everything they can to protect their homes from the flying pests. Many of them are buying fly stripping, and spending hundreds of dollars in the process. But even so, they say they're barely keeping the flies at bay.Lester Miller lives in Loganton, and isn't happy he has to hang the fly strips. "I don't like doing it -- it's a thing I have to do every morning. It's not the easiest thing to do," he said.Residents have been working with county officials to resolve the problem. They discovered the flies are coming from nearby chicken farms. Their manure is the perfect home for fly larvae. The hatched flies will then travel more than two miles away in search of a new place to call home.Chemicals can be sprayed on the manure to kill the larvae, but many of the farms in the area are organic. The farm near Barb Sweeney's home is just that -- an organic chicken farm.Clinton county officials do say many of the Amish farmers in the area are being cooperative. They say getting rid of the infestation is a community effort, and politicians, farmers, and homeowners are all working together to alleviate the problem.Unfortunately, many people are saying it's too late to completely get rid of the infestation until the weather changes."We're praying for snow and heavy frost," Sweeney said.