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A good reason for snail mail

According to the USPS 2010 report there was a 24% drop in the number of greeting cards mailed within the U.S. But maybe the new commemorative USPS stamp release will bring in some sales.
/ Source: MSNBC TV

According to the USPS 2010 report there was a 24% drop in the number of greeting cards mailed within the U.S. But maybe the new commemorative USPS stamp release will bring in some sales.

Remember the days when on your birthday you would go to your mailbox and open it up and a flood of brightly colored envelopes would fall into your hands? Now you can expect to get dozens of Facebook and text messages, a handful of tweets, a few emails and probably a phone call or two–if you are lucky. The digital and social media age is upon us and there is no returning to days of ‘snail mail.’

According to the USPS 2010 report there was a 24% drop in the number of greeting cards mailed within the United States and the numbers continue to drop.

Card companies such as Hallmark are seeing major hits in sales, 5 billion cards a year in 2012 compared to 6 billion cards in 2011. IBISWorld, a research firm that monitors the greeting cards industry, reported in the past decade there was a 60% decline in traditional greeting card sales. On the other hand, digital greeting card companies like Blue MountainEGreetings and Paperless Post   are seeing increases in their sales with a 17.5% rise in 2012.

Despite declines in traditional pen and paper card sales, don’t abandon paper and pen just yet: you may want to stamp your next letter with the latest stamp release. Today the United States Postal Service release a social media generated commemorative stamp for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

With the help of 3,000 Facebook and Twitter profile photos, the USPS created a limited edition, mosaic stamp of a scene from the 1963 event. You can actually visit the USPS Facebook page and zoom into each profile picture used in the mosaic.

“We feel this digital unveil marks a special moment to commemorate the civil rights movement,” Nagisa Manabe, the USPS’s executive vice president and chief marketing and sales officer, told . “We have been looking for ways to engage a new generation of stamp collectors and the American public as it relates to our limited–edition stamps.”

This was the first ever digital debut for the USPS.