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Adidas reportedly accepts logo restrictions

Adidas will not display its three-stripe logo in full on athletes’ sportswear at the Olympic Games after losing a dispute with rivals, a German newspaper quoted its chief executive as saying on Thursday.
/ Source: Reuters

Adidas will not display its three-stripe logo in full on athletes’ sportswear at the Olympic Games after losing a dispute with rivals, a German newspaper quoted its chief executive as saying on Thursday.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has decided company logos on an area larger than 20 square centimeters would no longer be allowed on sportswear at the games, taking effect at the Turin tournament in 2006.

Rivals Nike and Puma had asked the IOC to prevent Adidas from supplying athletes with sportswear with its three-stripe logo down the length of the clothes.

“We have accepted the decision by the IOC,” CEO Herbert Hainer told the Sueddeutsche Zeitung in an interview published before publication on Friday.

In the past 30 years, Adidas has supplied athletes with sportswear often almost fully covered with its logo on sleeves or trousers in a move to raise brand awareness.

“The three-stripes won’t be seen on sleeves or trousers at the winter games in Turin 2006 any more,” Hainer said, adding that Adidas, however, planned a “creative” fashion solution in the future.

“We’ll play with the number three. I cannot say more right now,” he added.

Major sporting events such as the Olympics offer great branding potential for sports goods firms, which spend millions of euros supplying the best teams and athletes with sportswear with its own logo.

Adidas and Puma have been rivals for decades after two brothers fell out, closed their former sports shoe factory in the small town of Herzogenaurach, founded their own ones and were never reconciled.