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Was MLK more like Black Lives Matter than we think?

04:02

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the face of the American civil rights movement — representing peace, colorblindness, and nonviolence — but this may be only one watered down version of King. Jeanne Theoharis, professor and author of "A More Beautiful and Terrible History," challenges what she calls the "fables of Martin Luther King Jr." and reveals a portrait of a man unpopular during his life, who had more in common with the Black Lives Matter activists of today.