First Read's Morning Clips

by Leigh Ann Caldwell /  / Updated 

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OFF TO THE RACES: When intrigue turns into fatigue

BIDEN: The New York Times writes that Biden momentum has “stalled” and “intrigue can easily turn into fatigue” over a possible Biden run.

The super PAC encouraging him to run, Draft Biden, released a new ad this morning called "Never Quit,” NBC’s Kristen Welker reports.

BUSH: He will unveil what he will do after he repeals Obamacare.

CLINTON: “There’s a deep hunger for more action and more fire in belly, and lots of worry all the energy is with Bernie,” said a major Clinton bundler in New York told Politico. The AP reports that Clinton’s email server “was connected to the Internet in ways that made it more vulnerable to hackers, according to data and documents reviewed by The Associated Press.”

Flanked by union members, Clinton attends rally outside of Trump’s hotel in Las Vegas – one of the few nonunion hotels in Las Vegas.

RUBIO: Mega wealthy casino mogul Sheldon Adelson is “leaning” toward Rubio, Politico writes.

The wealthiest one percent of Americans will make out the best under Rubio’s tax plan because his plan ELIMINATES taxes on capital gains and dividends, National Journal reports.

SANDERS: NBC’s Perry Bacon writes that as Sanders evolves from a protest candidate to a legitimate contender, some of his positions have also evolved.

TRUMP: He attended a forum designed by a group that wants to de-politicize politics. But he didn’t really adhere to the point.

And Trump is alleging that a woman who questioned him at a New Hampshire rally is an intern working for Bush.

CONGRESS: Still watching Paul Ryan

Paul Ryan is doing what most male lawmakers don’t: Put his family first

The New York Times writes that as he is pondering the speakership, the far fight “is trotting out a fresh concern: Mr. Ryan is too far left.”

OBAMA AGENDA: Troops to remain in Afghanistan?

Troops to Remain in Afghanistan? Yes it’s a possibility and the Washington Post writes that leaving 5,000 troops in the country “is a choice that would contravene a long-held personal desire and central tenet of his election campaigns — a definitive end to the wars he had inherited.

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