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Rachel Maddow Presents: Ultra

From the Archives: Episode Seven

/ 14 PHOTOS
Wild Bill Langer

Wild Bill Langer

Photo of North Dakota Republican Sen. William Langer. Langer served two terms as governor of North Dakota, and was later elected to the United States Senate. Langer is pictured here appearing before a Senate committee, which was hearing evidence on whether he was fit to serve in the Senate.

AP Photo
To the streets

To the streets

After North Dakota Governor William Langer was convicted on corruption charges, the state Supreme Court removed him from office. Langer's supporters took to the streets of Bismarck to demand that Langer be reinstated as governor.

State Historical Society of North Dakota
Fit to serve

Fit to serve

Sen. William Langer (right) with Sen. Tom Connally during Langer's ethics hearing in the Senate.

International News
Keeping tabs

Keeping tabs

Before William Langer was seated in the Senate, lawmakers debated whether he was morally fit to assume office, given his history of corruption. Langer sat at his desk and listened to the debates about his character and fitness for office.

State Historical Society of North Dakota
Chief Justice Edward Eicher

Chief Justice Edward Eicher

Chief Justice Edward Eicher presided over the Mass Sedition Trial of 1944. Eicher died in his sleep in November 1944, and the proceedings ended in a mistrial.

AP Photo
Impeach Eicher

Impeach Eicher

An excerpt of the sedition trial court transcript from July 5, 1944. A defense attorney for one sedition defendant asks to read from a petition calling for the impeachment of Justice Eicher.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
Petition to disqualify Eicher (page 1)

Petition to disqualify Eicher (page 1)

Page one of a petition filed by the defendants to disqualify Chief Justice Edward Eicher from presiding over the 1944 sedition trial. The petition accuses Justice Eicher of "bias and prejudice against the defense and in favor of the prosecution."

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
Petition to disqualify Eicher (page 2)

Petition to disqualify Eicher (page 2)

Page two of a petition filed by the defendants to disqualify Chief Justice Edward Eicher from presiding over the 1944 sedition trial. Lawyers representing 19 of the defendants signed the petition.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
Edward James Smythe

Edward James Smythe

Photo of sedition trial defendant Edward James Smythe. Smythe attempted to flee to Canada before the start of the trial, and was believed to regularly show up to the courtroom drunk.

ACME
Making an entrance

Making an entrance

Sedition defendant Edward James Smythe arrives at the sedition trial flanked by two FBI agents after attempting to flee the country ahead of the proceedings.

ACME
The Garners

The Garners

Photo of sedition trial defendants Elmer J. Garner (right) and his son James F. Garner (left.) Elmer Garner died before the case reached opening statements.

ACME
Alderman and Sage

Alderman and Sage

Photo of sedition trial defendants Garland Alderman (left) and Parker Sage (right). Alderman was the former leader of the Pontiac, Michigan chapter of the America First Committee.

ACME
The sad duty

The sad duty

An excerpt of the sedition trial court transcript from November 30th, 1944. The death of Chief Justice Edward Eicher is announced to the court.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
Unboxing

Unboxing

Court transcripts from the 1944 sedition trial preserved at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

Kelsey Desiderio/MSNBC
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