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O. John Rogge

Rachel Maddow Presents: Ultra

From the Archives: Episode Six

/ 18 PHOTOS
O. John Rogge

O. John Rogge

O. John Rogge, head of the Criminal Division at the U.S. Department of Justice. Rogge is pictured here on Feb. 12, 1943, after being put in charge of the sedition investigation.

AP Photo/Eugene Abbott
Huey Long

Huey Long

Sen. Huey Long (D-LA) addressing a crowd in New Orleans on Nov. 12, 1934. Before Long was elected to the U.S. Senate, he was Governor of Louisiana.

AP Photo
Give the people a Governor

Give the people a Governor

Campaign poster for Huey Long's 1924 Louisiana gubernatorial campaign.

Source:
Criminal No. 73086

Criminal No. 73086

Indictment brought by special prosecutor O. John Rogge on Jan. 3, 1944. Rogge charged 30 Americans with seditious conspiracy, for allegedly trying to overthrow the government of the United States.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
Lois de Lafayette Washburn

Lois de Lafayette Washburn

Sedition trial defendant Lois de Lafayette Washburn gives the Nazi salute outside the courthouse on the first day of the trial on April 17, 1944.

AP Photo
Hitching a ride

Hitching a ride

Nazi agent and sedition trial defendant George Sylvester Viereck enters a prison van to be taken to the Washington, DC federal courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
In handcuffs

In handcuffs

Sedition trial defendant August Klapprott enters a prison van in handcuffs to be taken to the Washington, DC federal courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
Small talk

Small talk

Sedition trial defendant Elizabeth Dilling (left) stands in front of the courthouse with her husband and daughter on the first day of the trial on April 17, 1944.

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
Say cheese

Say cheese

Sedition trial defendant Eugene Nelson stands outside the courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
Family photo

Family photo

Sedition trial defendant Gerald Burton Winrod and his wife pose outside the courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
Buddy system

Buddy system

Sedition defendants Eugene Nelson and Joe McWilliams pose in front of the courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
Staying informed

Staying informed

Sedition defendant Ernest Elmhurst reads the newspaper outside the courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
Incoming

Incoming

Sedition trial defendant Lawrence Dennis arrives at the courthouse on May 9, 1944.

Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images
On behalf of the United States

On behalf of the United States

A page of the sedition trial court transcript from May 17, 1944, the day special prosecutor O. Jon Rogge delivered his opening statement to the jury.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
\"I am a Republican, not a Nazi\"

"I am a Republican, not a Nazi."

An excerpt of the sedition trial court transcript from May 17, 1944. Defendant Edward James Smythe interrupted Rogge to exclaim, "I am a Republican, not a Nazi."

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
\"That is a damned lie.\"

"That is a damned lie."

An excerpt of the sedition trial court transcript from May 17, 1944. Defendants Robert Noble and Ellis O. Jones interrupt Rogge to accuse him of lying to the court about the charges against them.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
\"Sit down!\"

"Sit down!"

An excerpt of the sedition trial court transcript from May 17, 1944. Defendants erupted into yells for prosecutor O. John Rogge to sit down during his opening statement to the jury.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
Gaveling furiously for order

Gavelling furiously for order

An excerpt of the sedition trial court transcript from May 17, 1944. Chief Justice Edward Eicher had to repeatedly use his gavel to silence the defendants during opening statements.

United States v. McWilliams, Cr. No. 73086/The National Archives
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