Kim Kardashian accused of cultural appropriation — again — over name of shapewear line

Many social media users found the name of the brand, Kimono, ill-fitting. It inspired the hashtag #KimOhNo.
Kim Kardashian arrives for the 2018 LACMA Art+Film Gala in Los Angeles on Nov. 3, 2018.
Kim Kardashian West arrives for the 2018 LACMA Art+Film Gala in Los Angeles on Nov. 3, 2018.Chris Delmas / AFP - Getty Images file

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.
SUBSCRIBE
By Janelle Griffith

Kim Kardashian West is being accused of cultural appropriation — again — this time, for the name of her new shapewear line, Kimono.

The reality television star announced the collection of skin tone-colored shapewear, on social media Tuesday.

"Kimono is my take on shapewear and solutions for women that actually work," Kardashian West wrote.

She shared a series of photos from the brand, which is available in nine skin-toned shades, and said it had been in the works for 15 years.

The Morning Rundown

Get a head start on the morning's top stories.

“I would always cut up my shapewear to make my own styles, and there have also been so many times I couldn’t find a shapewear color that blended with my skin tone so we needed a solution for all of this," she wrote.

Kimono, Kimono Body and Kimono Solutionwear were all registered this month with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Many social media users found the name of the brand ill-fitting.

Kimono is the Japanese term for a loose-sleeved robe. The brand name Kimono inspired the hashtag #KimOhNo, which had been used more than 50,000 times on Twitter as of Wednesday afternoon.

"Nice underwear, but as a Japanese woman who loves to wear our traditional dress, kimono, I find the naming of your products baffling (since it has no resemblance to kimono), if not outright culturally offensive, especially if it’s merely a word play on your name. Pls reconsider," one Twitter user wrote.

Kardashian West was also criticized for not using any plus-size models in her images, despite the shapewear being offered in sizes XXS to 4XL.

This is the latest instance in which Kardashian West has been labeled by some critics as a "culture vulture."

She was slammed in June 2018 for wearing Fulani braids, which are believed to have originated in African regions, and crediting them to a white woman by describing them as Bo Derek braids. The small braided cornrows have been worn by women of color, in particular those of African descent, long prior to Derek in the 1979 film "10."

At the time, Kardashian West said she knew the origins of the hairstyle and did not intend to be disrespectful in how she described them.

"I remember the backlash when I had the blonde hair and that I called them 'Bo Derek braids.' But I obviously know they're called Fulani braids and I know the origin of where they came from and I'm totally respectful of that," Kardashian West told Bustle. "I'm not tone deaf to where I don't get it. I do get it."

NBC News reached out to representatives for Kardashian West but did not immediately hear back.