Boston Bombing Trial: 10 Women, 8 Men Selected as Jurors

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Ten women and eight men were selected Tuesday to sit as jurors in the trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhohkar Tsarnaev. While six of them are being designated as alternates, all must report when the trial resumes at 9 a.m. ET Wednesday with opening statements in Boston federal court.

The final stage of jury selection capped off nearly two months of whittling down jurors — slowed by Tsarnaev's defense team's asking four times to have the trial moved out of Boston. His lawyers argued that he would not be able to find an impartial jury, given the heightened emotions in the case. Tsarnaev faces 30 charges for his alleged role in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, which killed three people and wounded 264 others. If found guilty, the 21-year-old could be put to death.

The jurors are:
  • Juror 35: A man who works for the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources. He told the court that he attended a fund-raiser for marathon bombing victims and donated $50 or $75 and that he was open to life or death sentences in this case based on the evidence.
  • Juror 41: A woman who describes herself as a senior executive assistant. She told the court that one of her friends, a former correctional officer, now works in human resources for the sheriff's department and that other friends work for jail systems.
  • Juror 83: A man who says he was a student studying psychology and neuroscience before his financial aid fell through. He told the court he doesn't know much about the case but believes Tsarnaev "was involved in something" and that he thinks the death penalty is valid.
  • Juror 102: A woman who's a nurse at Good Samaritan Medical Center in Brockton, Massachusetts. She told the court says she has no opinion on the death penalty. Adding, "I am really in the middle." She told the government she could impose death penalty if appropriate.
  • Juror 138: A man who works for the water department in a city near Boston. He wrote "no" on his questionnaire when asked whether he believed Tsarnaev was guilty and said he favors the death penalty.
  • Juror 229: A woman who runs events and is a former domestic violence social worker. She told the court she's unsure about whether Tsarnaev is guilty and about the validity of the death penalty.
  • Juror 286: A woman who supervises about 50 workers at a restaurant. She told the court she has been high-fived for wearing a "Boston Strong" shirt and that she could vote for the death penalty.
  • Juror 349: A woman who designs women's clothing for a startup firm. She told the court she believes Tsarnaev is guilty but is unsure about the death penalty.
  • Juror 395: A woman who's a legal executive assistant for a managing director of a corporation. She told the court she believes Tsarnaev is guilty but is unsure about the death penalty.
  • Juror 441: A man who says he was fired as an auditor in January and is trying to collect unemployment. He told the court he's unsure whether Tsarnaev is guilty and is neutral on the death penalty.
  • Juror 480: A man who works at Massachusetts General Hospital as a telecommunications engineer. He told the court he would need to see evidence before deciding guilt or innocence.
  • Juror 487: A woman who's a single parent with three children at home. She told the court she believes Tsarnaev is guilty but is unsure about the death penalty. She says she bought a "Boston Strong" T-shirt for a nephew.
  • Juror 552: A man who is retired from the telecommunications industry. He told the court he has friends or relatives in law enforcement but remains unsure whether Tsarnaev is guilty and is open to death penalty or life sentence.
  • Juror 567: A man who works as an air traffic controller at Otis Air National Guard Base in Falmouth. He told the court he believes Tsarnaev "was somewhat involved" but that he can be impartial and is open to the death penalty.
  • Juror 588: A woman who works in digital sales for Barnes & Noble. She told the court she believes there was "some involvement" by Tsarnaev but is unsure whether he guilty of the specific charges, and she expressed reservations about the death penalty.
  • Juror 598: A man who paints houses. He told the court he's unsure whether Tsarnaev is guilty and is conflicted about the death penalty. He said his wife might have donated to a victims fund.
  • Juror 608: A woman who is retired as an actuary.
  • Juror 638: A woman who's a supervisor at a government agency. She told the court she's unsure whether Tsarnaev is guilty.

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— Andy Thibault, Erik Ortiz and M. Alex Johnson

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