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KNOW IT ALL: Tuesday’s Top 6 Stories at NBC News

People react as they attend a national tribute for the three officers killed during last week's terrorist attacks, in front of Paris Prefecture on Jan. 13, 2015. The three police officers were killed in terror attacks at the offices of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and in the streets of Montrouge, outside the French capital. GONZALO FUENTES / Reuters

Good morning. Here are some of the stories we’re following today:

1. Day of mourning for victims of Paris attack

The funerals of four people killed in Friday’s attack on a kosher market in Paris were held in Jerusalem on Tuesday as mourners also gathered in France. The ceremony was attended by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who told families that their relatives were “killed only because they were Jewish." French President Francois Hollande also led a ceremony honoring the three police officers killed during last week’s terror attacks, which began at the offices of the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo. Meanwhile, the editors of Charlie Hebdo plan to roll out an unprecedented 3 million copies Wednesday of its first issue since the attack. The cover will feature a cartoon of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad in tears. Read more in NEWS.

Charlie Hebdo Journalists Get Back to Work After Massacre 1:40

2. White House: Senior official should have gone to Paris

Obama administration spokesman Josh Earnest conceded Monday that the White House should have sent a high-ranking official to attend Sunday’s solidarity march in Paris that drew 3.5 million people. The only noted American official in attendance was the U.S ambassador to France. The lack of a senior presence drew criticism from Republicans and even some Democrats who said the administration failed to show that the U.S. stands with its allies. But Earnest said going to Paris to a last-minute outdoor event posed “significant security challenges.” Read more in POLITICS.

3. Second black box retrieved from AirAsia crash

Divers in the Java Sea found the second black box of Flight 8501 on Tuesday — a key tool in helping to determine why the jetliner crashed after leaving Indonesia last month. Searchers have also been trying to locate the main section of the aircraft's cabin, where many of the victims are believed to be entombed. Decomposition is making identification more difficult for desperate families waiting to bury their loved ones. Only 48 bodies of the 162 people on board have been retrieved. Read more in NEWS.

4. Ohio State wins national college football title

The Ohio State Buckeyes stomped out the Oregon Ducks 42-20 on Monday night to capture the first national championship in the playoff era. The University of Oregon had been looking for its first national title, but Ohio’s aggressive play was helped by running back Ezekiel Elliot, who scored four touchdowns and ran 246 yards on 36 carries. The revelry in Columbus, however, turned violent and police in riot gear used tear gas to disperse the crowds. Read more in SPORTS.

5. CENTCOM’s Twitter back up after hacking

U.S. Central Command’s Twitter and YouTube accounts were up and running Tuesday, a day after pro-ISIS messages posted by unknown hackers forced the military to temporarily take them down. Hackers who gained control of the Twitter account replaced CENTCOM's banner and profile avatars with images from the "CyberCaliphate," one of which read "i love you isis." The hackers posted tweets in which they claimed to have broken into U.S. military computers and extracted information about service members and their families. Twitter said that it does not comment on individual accounts, but that the company was helping the Pentagon resolve an "account security issue." Read more in NEWS.

6. UVA reinstates fraternity in rape scandal

Phi Kappa Psi is being reinstated immediately after police could not corroborate reports that a gang rape had taken place as first reported in a Rolling Stone story in November. The University of Virginia had suspended all of its fraternities and sororities in the wake of the scandal, and officials had come up with new guidelines on how to deal with sexual assaults. But discrepancies were found in the Rolling Stone piece, leading the university to reevaluate its position on Greek activities. Read more in NEWS.

And now this …

Electric cars have made barely a dent in our driving culture but Chevy's new offering, the Bolt, hopes to change that with 200 miles to a charge and a cost around $30,000.

Will the Chevy Bolt Change Be a Game-Changing Electric Car? 0:19