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Mexico releases video of Ecuadorian police raiding its embassy in Quito

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said the video showed the “authoritarian and vile” way police raided the embassy.
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/ Source: The Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Mexico released security camera video Tuesday of the moments when Ecuadorian authorities forced their way into Mexico’s embassy, pushed a Mexican diplomat to the ground and carried out Ecuador’s former vice president who had been holed up there.

The action Friday night greatly escalated tensions between the two countries, which had already been tussling since ex-Vice President Jorge Glas, a convicted criminal and fugitive, took refuge at Mexico’s embassy in December.

Ecuadorian police scaled the embassy walls and broke into the building Friday. Roberto Canseco, Mexico’s head of consular affairs and the highest ranking diplomat present since Ecuador expelled the ambassador earlier in the week, tried to keep them from entering, even pushing a large cabinet in front of a door.

But police restrained him and pushed him to the floor as they carried Glas out.

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Police break into the Mexican Embassy in Quito, Ecuador, on Friday.David Bustillos / AP

Mexico, as well as experts, say it appeared to be a blatant violation of international accords. Mexico broke off diplomatic relations with the country in response. Leaders across Latin America condemned Ecuador’s actions as a violation of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

At his daily news briefing Tuesday, Mexico President Andrés Manuel López Obrador played the security video and said it showed the “authoritarian and vile” way police had raided the embassy.

López Obrador criticized North American allies Canada and the United States for what he said was not speaking out forcefully enough against the raid. Mexico has said it plans to file a formal complaint with the International Court of Justice.

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